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I need help with rates and ratio?

I need help with rates and ratio? Topic: How to write a unit rate
June 16, 2019 / By Stephania
Question: there is 2 math problem that asking me to write it in a rates or ratios form....i learned about rates and ratio last year but i totally forgot how to do it.....can someone help me explaining what is rates and ratio how to write it and what are they used for????.... here are the 2 math problem * An Iditarod team could fini the race with an average speed of 5 miles per hour. How far could that team go in 9.5 hours?? i got 47.5 miles (i multiply 5 and 9.5) * A car on an Iowa interstate could go 70 miles per hour.. How far could it go in 9.5 hours? i got 665 miles....(i multiply 70 miles and 9.5 hours)
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Best Answers: I need help with rates and ratio?

Quella Quella | 7 days ago
Hi there: You got them right. Ratios might be hard to understand but they are not. A ratio or rate is a measure of how many divided by an unit. For the most part we think about speed, but there are other ratios like pounds per square inch (psi), or kilowatt hour (kwh). All you need to keep in mind is that it's that you are measuring something. For example, if a tire manufacturer states that the maximun amount of pressure is 25psi, then you know you can't put more air in the tire, otherwise it's more likely to fail because the tire is made to hold 25 psi. Think about it, 25pounds of pressure in one square inch, that's quite a bit. Another example: if a car speed is 30 kph, then in 3 hours, you would drive 90 kilometers. Also keep in mind the consistency of units, english units with english units, metric with metric. Hope it helps. :o)
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Quella Originally Answered: I need help with rates and ratio?
Hi there: You got them right. Ratios might be hard to understand but they are not. A ratio or rate is a measure of how many divided by an unit. For the most part we think about speed, but there are other ratios like pounds per square inch (psi), or kilowatt hour (kwh). All you need to keep in mind is that it's that you are measuring something. For example, if a tire manufacturer states that the maximun amount of pressure is 25psi, then you know you can't put more air in the tire, otherwise it's more likely to fail because the tire is made to hold 25 psi. Think about it, 25pounds of pressure in one square inch, that's quite a bit. Another example: if a car speed is 30 kph, then in 3 hours, you would drive 90 kilometers. Also keep in mind the consistency of units, english units with english units, metric with metric. Hope it helps. :o)
Quella Originally Answered: I need help with rates and ratio?
Your math is right on both problems If a car is traveling at a rate of 5 miles per hour, in 9.5 hours it will travel 665 miles.

Meed Meed
Your math is right on both problems If a car is traveling at a rate of 5 miles per hour, in 9.5 hours it will travel 665 miles.
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Meed Originally Answered: Question on easy molar ratio?
No it wouldn't because the ratio will always be 1:2 for Cu:Ag Simply adding more reactant will not change the molecular equation.
Meed Originally Answered: Question on easy molar ratio?
Think of bicycles that need tyres. No matter how many tyres you bring along, you'll only ever be able to fit two tyres on each bicyle, no more. If you 10 bikes and 20 tyres, the 10 bikes will each have two tyres (this is the stoichiometric ratio of bikes to tyres) If you have 10 bikes, and 2000 tyres, you'll still only have 10 bikes with two tyres each, and have lots of tyres left over. No matter what you do, the ratio of tyres to bikes is always going to be 2:1. In the above equation, no matter how much extra silver nitrate you add, the ratio of the silver produced to the copper used will always be the same, 2:1

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