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Hypoglycemia or something similar?

Hypoglycemia or something similar? Topic: Flood management case study
June 16, 2019 / By Alyse
Question: Yesterday I stopped at a new local bar that a good friend of mine owns. I had eaten a decent meal around noon and then lightly snacked an hour or so before I went (which was at 4:30pm). I only drank a couple of beers and tried a couple of samples of mixed drinks that the bartender wanted my advice on. Also I was there for over three hours so I wasn't drinking fast. I was probably legally intoxicated but I was by far not drunk at the very least. I then got really shaky, started sweating, was having a little bit difficulty forming words, and then passed out. As long as I was laying flat on my back on the floor I felt perfectly fine could speak fine but I was still sweating heavily. So a friend of mine picked me back up and no sooner then I stood back up I passed out again. Then again I started feeling fine and my friend wanted to see if I could sit up but not stand up. Again I got dizzy and felt faint. So I laid down again. Shortly after laying back down the 3rd time I vomited. Of course they called the EMT's and it took a while for them to get there but by the time they did I was perfectly fine. Just felt worn out. They also had called my sister which is a nurse and she showed up at the same time as the EMT's. After examining me and taking statements from myself and everyone there who had seen the whole thing and knew how little I had actually drank they determined that it was hypoglycemia. I chose to go home with my sister and as soon as we got to her house she took my blood sugar with a blood sugar meter and my blood sugar was only 71. She gave me her meter and took me back to get my car this morning and told me to log my blood sugar for the next few days. At noon I ate a donut and checked my blood sugar about a half an hour later. It was still only 87. Then at 1 pm I drank a Mountain Dew and my blood sugar was 104. But being very fatigued I took a very long nap but when I got up around 6:30 and at this point I had not eaten anything else I took my blood again and it was 172!!! Then I drank a large glass of chocolate milk and ate some broccoli with ranch dressing and an hour later I checked my blood sugar again and it was only 87. I'm going back to the doctor tomorrow but does anyone have any ideas why my blood sugar is so all over the place? Trust me, I usually eat pretty regularly and very healthy. Heck....today I've had more sugar than I have in months just because I knew it was running low. And I always eat several small meals a day but have been light headed and dizzy at times before. So it's like something has been going on but the climax of it happened yesterday. Any thoughts or ideas would be so helpful. I've been trying to research on the internet and haven't had very much luck since I've never been diagnosed with any kind of diabetes. I had lab work done less than 6 months ago and everything was fine at that time. Thanks for any suggestions! :) According to my sister who is a nurse and a few websites that I have looked into the normal blood sugar upon waking or before meals should run between 70 to 130. And after eating it should run generally between 120 even up to 180. But not over 180. But if you read my main post you can see that my sugar is very erratic under both circumstances. I will be going to the doctor tomorrow but my actual question is has anyone else had a similar experience and what did they have to do about it. Thanks! :)
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Best Answers: Hypoglycemia or something similar?

Vic Vic | 7 days ago
Blood sugar would *never* be anywhere near 180 mg/dL in a non-diabetic, regardless of what was eaten and when. Generally, a doctor will say that anything over 140 mg/dL after a meal is suspect, but there's a difference between clinical standards and the average and mode. The blood sugar average and mode are considerably below what physicians consider normal. As I said, 140 mg/dL is sort of the upper limit of "normal," but if you look at studies of non-diabetic blood sugar, what you see is that your average non-diabetic doesn't really spike over 120 mg/dL at any point after eating and falls to baseline blood sugar - usually in the low 80s - within 1-2 hours. In fact, many people without diabetes don't spike over 100 at any point after eating. As a diabetic, that was a real revelation for me, and I confirmed that many of my non-diabetic friends follow the patterns I saw in studies and on blood sugar graphs. So, no, spiking up to 172 mg/dL is definitely not normal, whether you're looking at clinical standards or where most non-diabetics fall (which I think is more useful). I think your sister is getting her information from diabetes management websites. Organizations like the American Diabetes Association tell diabetics that it's okay to be <180 mg/dL 1-2 hours after a meal, so she might have confused standards for diabetics with diagnostic criteria. They're quite different. (By the way, research indicates organ, blood vessel, and nerve damage begins when blood sugar exceeds 140 mg/dL, so those standards really make me angry. I keep my blood sugar under 140 mg/dL *at all times*.) You say your blood sugar was only 71, but that's normal and shouldn't make you feel hypoglycemic. If blood sugar was the cause, that'd suggest you're running considerably higher than that or that you'd just come down from high blood sugar. If you're in truly non-diabetic range at all times (60-120 mg/dL or thereabouts), you wouldn't feel weak at 71 at all. You would feel bad if, say, your blood sugar were running in the 170s sometimes, followed by huge crashes to below 100. Wide swings, even if you're never hypoglycemic, can make you FEEL hypoglycemic. Case in point: right after I was diagnosed, I felt hypoglycemic with blood sugar in the 150s. Was I? Not at all, but compared to the 300+ levels my body was used to, I was. You only had one high reading, so I'm hesitant to say that you have diabetes or pre-diabetes or "glucose intolerance" or whatever other labels doctors want to put on it; however, it's never normal to be as high as you were, low normal numbers are making you feel sick, and you may have good numbers after consuming a lot of sugar because you're having rebound crashes after huge spikes (pancreas floods you with insulin to overcompensate). I suspect that any fasting blood sugar test wouldn't reveal what's going on with you. An A1c, which is a 90-day average of blood sugar, would probably be normal or borderline because you're clearly having a lot of normal blood sugar (<100). So, for you, you might think about asking for the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test. It involves drinking 75 grams of glucose and having your blood sugar monitored for several hours. Ask to be tested at least once an hour, ideally once every 30 minutes, because if you're having abnormal values, I suspect it'll be early. I also wouldn't be surprised if you had reactive hypoglycemia and dropped below 70.
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Vic Originally Answered: Hypoglycemia or something similar?
Blood sugar would *never* be anywhere near 180 mg/dL in a non-diabetic, regardless of what was eaten and when. Generally, a doctor will say that anything over 140 mg/dL after a meal is suspect, but there's a difference between clinical standards and the average and mode. The blood sugar average and mode are considerably below what physicians consider normal. As I said, 140 mg/dL is sort of the upper limit of "normal," but if you look at studies of non-diabetic blood sugar, what you see is that your average non-diabetic doesn't really spike over 120 mg/dL at any point after eating and falls to baseline blood sugar - usually in the low 80s - within 1-2 hours. In fact, many people without diabetes don't spike over 100 at any point after eating. As a diabetic, that was a real revelation for me, and I confirmed that many of my non-diabetic friends follow the patterns I saw in studies and on blood sugar graphs. So, no, spiking up to 172 mg/dL is definitely not normal, whether you're looking at clinical standards or where most non-diabetics fall (which I think is more useful). I think your sister is getting her information from diabetes management websites. Organizations like the American Diabetes Association tell diabetics that it's okay to be <180 mg/dL 1-2 hours after a meal, so she might have confused standards for diabetics with diagnostic criteria. They're quite different. (By the way, research indicates organ, blood vessel, and nerve damage begins when blood sugar exceeds 140 mg/dL, so those standards really make me angry. I keep my blood sugar under 140 mg/dL *at all times*.) You say your blood sugar was only 71, but that's normal and shouldn't make you feel hypoglycemic. If blood sugar was the cause, that'd suggest you're running considerably higher than that or that you'd just come down from high blood sugar. If you're in truly non-diabetic range at all times (60-120 mg/dL or thereabouts), you wouldn't feel weak at 71 at all. You would feel bad if, say, your blood sugar were running in the 170s sometimes, followed by huge crashes to below 100. Wide swings, even if you're never hypoglycemic, can make you FEEL hypoglycemic. Case in point: right after I was diagnosed, I felt hypoglycemic with blood sugar in the 150s. Was I? Not at all, but compared to the 300+ levels my body was used to, I was. You only had one high reading, so I'm hesitant to say that you have diabetes or pre-diabetes or "glucose intolerance" or whatever other labels doctors want to put on it; however, it's never normal to be as high as you were, low normal numbers are making you feel sick, and you may have good numbers after consuming a lot of sugar because you're having rebound crashes after huge spikes (pancreas floods you with insulin to overcompensate). I suspect that any fasting blood sugar test wouldn't reveal what's going on with you. An A1c, which is a 90-day average of blood sugar, would probably be normal or borderline because you're clearly having a lot of normal blood sugar (<100). So, for you, you might think about asking for the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test. It involves drinking 75 grams of glucose and having your blood sugar monitored for several hours. Ask to be tested at least once an hour, ideally once every 30 minutes, because if you're having abnormal values, I suspect it'll be early. I also wouldn't be surprised if you had reactive hypoglycemia and dropped below 70.

Ross Ross
Well, hypoglycemia does happen when drinking alcohol, but the sweating, difficulty forming words, nausea and especially feeling fine while lying down but passing out again when standing would indicate vasovagal syncope. It's triggered by fear, anxiety and stress which builds up within you, a simple scent can set it off. When it happens, lie down or sit down for about half an hour or you'll pass out again, have something ( not alcoholic ) to drink and keep your blood pressure up. Of course you should also check for hypoglycemia as hypoglycemia can be dangerous while vasovagal syncope isn't, if you don't have a glucose meter with you, have something sweet like orange juice just in case it is hypoglycemia and the fluid will help with vasovagal syncope too. Sometimes a Doctor can do a tilt table test to confirm vasovagal syncope but it's really a matter of ruling out other possibilities. Exercise can reduce the internal anxiety and stresses that you have.
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Montmorency Montmorency
I was diagnosed with reactive hpoglycaemia and I know how horrible it can be. If it is anxiety there is a little test you can do. Immediately sit down somewhere and breath out slowly - a long gentle out-breath untill you become relaxed. It takes around 2 minutes for the excess adrenaline to be used up and cleared from your blood, once you are calm. Panic attacks are usually accompanied by a strong belief that you are going to die or make a fool of yourself or lose control - and THAT is what is making you afraid. It sounds like it's your blood sugar which is really easy to sort out if you cut the rubbish out of your diet you could get a good improvement in a few week. And getting the blood sugar right can reduce any anxieties in general and improve mood etc. I know, I've been there. Make yourself well again!
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Keane Keane
EMT can't diagnose you, also 71 and 84 are normal ranges for blood sugar. Go to the doctors and get yourself checked out.
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Keane Originally Answered: Biographys based on a red head women? or someone similar to?
Try looking into a random celebrities biography and seeing if anything resembles your personality. Narrowing your choices by "bright red hair" is really not the way to go. And you don't need a formal biography to write a speech about them, get creative and pull up websites about them, such as this one: http://arianagrande.wikia.com/wiki/Arian... Good luck!

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