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Has the electronic application process has been a detriment to someone really winning a job?

Has the electronic application process has been a detriment to someone really winning a job? Topic: Cover letter of organization
June 16, 2019 / By Raschelle
Question: I recently applied for a job that required a B.A. in History or Social Studies; thankfully I have a B.A. in History. A subsequent Masters in Humanities, History, or Education; I do have a Masters degree in one of these fields. It required 5 years of management experience; I have only 2 years of management experience and 1 year of administration experience. I was turned away as soon as my application as reviewed because I only had 2 years of managerial experience; I do however, have years in for teaching and dealing with children. Basically, everything the job wanted but minus three years missed for management. I know if I was granted an opportunity to go in and have a face to face interview, the outcome could have been different. I miss the days (mind you I am only 26) where you interviewed for jobs, not send in a resume and have one person look at it, find one miniscule detail and send it away. I know that jobs are landed through charisma, intelligence, ability and the opportunity for the interviewer to see how a candidate is in person, not face to face. A resume only shows a person’s education, references and past job experience---it does not represent a person full social capabilities and character. So it has sparked the question, do you think the fact that the electronic action of applying for jobs has been a detriment? PS: This job has been open for months due to the fact they can’t find the exact requirements. I question the person I spoke to on the phone and said, well all I am missing is 3 years of menial management experience, and can your company not give leeway or opportunity to anyone who applies? I suspect this job will be open for a long time to come. I would understand if I applied for a job where I did not meet the educational or certification requirements, however I applied hoping that 3 years of management experience would not be that big of an issue.
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Best Answers: Has the electronic application process has been a detriment to someone really winning a job?

Merideth Merideth | 2 days ago
Depending on the organization, the resume might start off at an HR department whose main job is to make sure that all applicants have ALL the required education and experience before sending it on to the person who is ultimately responsible for hiring. Yes, it is frustrating, but it is not the result of the electronic application process....it's the result of a glut of employees and a scarcity of jobs, which requires that HR reps pre-screen all candidates and only allow the best candidates to progress forward. Yes, given the fact that they can't find a person for the job, it would make sense to lower the requirements. However, again, this is not an artifact of the electronic application process. Finally, I am also 26 and I'm not sure what "days" you are talking about where you interviewed for jobs before sending in a resume. It has never been the case that you could interview for a job without someone pre-approving you based on your resume and cover letter first. This is the order of operations at big organizations: 1. Your resume or application is reviewed by an HR rep to ensure that it meets the minimum requirements. 2. Your application, resume and cover letter are reviewed by 1-20 people. These people may initially weed out applications based on relative experience, but will eventually look at your cover letter for evidence of the "charisma, intelligence, ability," etc that they want to see. 3. The final candidates are invited for interviews and, if necessary, second interviews. 4. References of the final candidate(s), if not checked previously, are checked. 5. A job offer is made to the final candidate. If you are applying to a smaller organization, you might be able to bypass step 1, but you'll still have to be invited for an interview based on your resume and cover letter. You can never just walk in for an interview. Again, I don't think that the electronic action of applying for jobs factors in at all. It makes the field more competitive, since people aren't printing, signing, and mailing as many applications and can simply type up a cover letter and attach it with their resume to an email. The field is more competitive, but that doesn't mean that the job search process is less personal. There ARE places where they literally just do keyword searches of your application. I think that that is atrocious, but that's kind of what you get when you apply to a really big corporation or organization. You're going to lose out on the personal feeling of the application process even moreso that just places that have strict HR requirements.....but it sounds like applying to a big organization isn't the right choice for you anyway. PS: I also agree that it is frustrating when jobs ask for managerial experience and don't care about your years of teaching. What do they think teaching is? It's almost all management -- management of behavior, management of instruction, management of time, management of paperwork, etc.
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Merideth Originally Answered: Has the electronic application process has been a detriment to someone really winning a job?
Depending on the organization, the resume might start off at an HR department whose main job is to make sure that all applicants have ALL the required education and experience before sending it on to the person who is ultimately responsible for hiring. Yes, it is frustrating, but it is not the result of the electronic application process....it's the result of a glut of employees and a scarcity of jobs, which requires that HR reps pre-screen all candidates and only allow the best candidates to progress forward. Yes, given the fact that they can't find a person for the job, it would make sense to lower the requirements. However, again, this is not an artifact of the electronic application process. Finally, I am also 26 and I'm not sure what "days" you are talking about where you interviewed for jobs before sending in a resume. It has never been the case that you could interview for a job without someone pre-approving you based on your resume and cover letter first. This is the order of operations at big organizations: 1. Your resume or application is reviewed by an HR rep to ensure that it meets the minimum requirements. 2. Your application, resume and cover letter are reviewed by 1-20 people. These people may initially weed out applications based on relative experience, but will eventually look at your cover letter for evidence of the "charisma, intelligence, ability," etc that they want to see. 3. The final candidates are invited for interviews and, if necessary, second interviews. 4. References of the final candidate(s), if not checked previously, are checked. 5. A job offer is made to the final candidate. If you are applying to a smaller organization, you might be able to bypass step 1, but you'll still have to be invited for an interview based on your resume and cover letter. You can never just walk in for an interview. Again, I don't think that the electronic action of applying for jobs factors in at all. It makes the field more competitive, since people aren't printing, signing, and mailing as many applications and can simply type up a cover letter and attach it with their resume to an email. The field is more competitive, but that doesn't mean that the job search process is less personal. There ARE places where they literally just do keyword searches of your application. I think that that is atrocious, but that's kind of what you get when you apply to a really big corporation or organization. You're going to lose out on the personal feeling of the application process even moreso that just places that have strict HR requirements.....but it sounds like applying to a big organization isn't the right choice for you anyway. PS: I also agree that it is frustrating when jobs ask for managerial experience and don't care about your years of teaching. What do they think teaching is? It's almost all management -- management of behavior, management of instruction, management of time, management of paperwork, etc.
Merideth Originally Answered: Has the electronic application process has been a detriment to someone really winning a job?
Its disappointing that they won't give you an opportunity to interview however they have given you the reasons and also this is stated that this is something they require from the start! Recruitment can be a slow and difficult process on both sides however they have sat the critreia and likely to stick to it Good lucj

Leone Leone
Its disappointing that they won't give you an opportunity to interview however they have given you the reasons and also this is stated that this is something they require from the start! Recruitment can be a slow and difficult process on both sides however they have sat the critreia and likely to stick to it Good lucj
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Leone Originally Answered: Is college application process that stressful?
Try not to stress out so much...it's not that bad. Start the application process early to lower your stress-level. Some colleges have an "early action" option that will allow you to get all of your documents in early and get a decision by Christmas-time. Others have a "rolling admissions" policy, which means that as soon as your documents are recieved, you will recieve an admissions decision (within a couple weeks) by mail. Normally as long as you meet their minimum GPA and test score requirements and get everything in on time, you will be accepted. It's also important to apply early so that you can compare all of your financial aid options. Apply for any scholarship, no matter how little it is worth...any amount will help! Don't be afraid to ask for counselor for help with scholarships, that's what he's there for! It's his job to help you. Fill out the FAFSA (www.fafsa.ed.gov) anytime after January 1st of your senior year so you can possibly get some free money and apply for loans if you need them.Take the SAT or ACT over again if you feel that your score could be improved. Put aside a little time each day to work on your applications and essays so you don't end up waiting till the last minute and have to do everything in a hurry, thus inducing even MORE stress upon yourself. Make the most of your senior year. It goes by fast. Keep your grades up, because they DO still matter, and a drop in your GPA may lose you a scholarship. Good luck! Feel free to message me if you need any further advice. :)
Leone Originally Answered: Is college application process that stressful?
I was a senior in HS last year (class of 2008), and have just been through the process. There were only two real times I was nervous, at the very beginning and very end. At the beginning: at the beginning I was really nervous. I asked myself questions like where do I start? What essay question should I choose? What happens if they don't like my essay? I'm not even 100% sure where I want to go...those thoughts. After I got started on my essay, I felt better. I didn't have a clue what to write about, so I just free-wrote. I found something I could write about and my stress went down. I think it is pretty common to have stress at this point. It was actually pretty stressful for me. It didn't really impact any of my life, but it just kept popping into my thoughts. (Since you are starting so early, you will probably be stress free from this stage in a few weeks). I would recommend to get started on the apps asap for you to kinda change stress into positive energy by working it out. The other time I was stressful was the two weeks before I got my results. Did I really mess up my apps that much? That one blemish on my test record...will that mean anything? I hope the person who reviewed my app wasn't in a bad mood...etc. This is also a very common point to have stress. There's nothing you can do to avoid it, but you can minimize it by focusing on school, a club, etc. I hope this helps at least a little.

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