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How is Law School and what do you do?

How is Law School and what do you do? Topic: High school law case studies
June 16, 2019 / By Lorayne
Question: I am taking a law class in school and It totally fascinates me and I am really good at it. Whenever she gives us case studies, I make sure I go home and do them to the best of my abilities. It's so amazing :) And I have been thinking about going to Law school after I graduate. I am just curious to know how it is and what you exactly do. How do they test you and stuff? Whatever the answer is, I will still be going, but I am just curious to see what you guys say :) Thank You!
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Best Answers: How is Law School and what do you do?

Kassidy Kassidy | 3 days ago
Law school is incredibly difficult. First, you have to take the LSAT and get a 150 (very low end of acceptable), then you have to apply. To apply is generally about $50 per school. Once you get in and get started you will be taking classes with valedictorians from high school and kids who got 4.0's in undergrad. Everyone is very smart. The amount of work and reading is incredible. You will generally read around 30 pages a night (or more) per class, and you will be expected to know the reading very well. You will be called on in the "socratic" style, which means the teacher will pick your name and then ask you, and only you, questions until he's tired of you, or until you screw up. Most law school classes are tested cumulatively at the end of the semester with an essay final examination. Law school finals last for 2 weeks and generally last 3-4 hours each. I just graduated from law school, and passed the bar, and it's not something I would recommend to anyone who isn't 100% sure they want to be a lawyer! It's a ton of work, but you will meet some great people and learn a lot!
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Kassidy Originally Answered: Survey for current public high school students on school violence?
1) Grade Level ;11 2) Age) 17 3) Sex: FEMALE 4) How would you rate the occurrences of violence in your school? MAJOR PROBLEM 5) How many violent situations can you recall witnessing or being involved in on school property within the last 30 days? a lot 6) To the best of your knowledge, how often do the following types of problems occur at your school? A. Student Racial Tension OFTEN B. Student Bullying DAILY C. Student Verbal Abuse of teachers. OFTEN D. Widespread Disorder Of Classrooms OCCASIONALLY E. Student Acts of Disrespect for teachersOFTEN 7) In the last 30 days, how many times have you witnessed a teacher or other faculty member ignore altercations (verbal or physical) between students? many 8) During the current school year, how many times have you received detention or suspension due to a verbal or physical altercation? none 9) Describe the most effective student safety measures that you are aware of currently in place at your school. Alarm bell screaming send everyone running 10) Does your school use electronic surveillance to monitor activities inside the school and/or school grounds? YES 11 A. Do you feel that use of such electronic surveillance leads to fewer violent situations within the school setting? YES B. If you answer yes, do you also feel that using electronic surveillance in schools results in a safer learning environment? YES 12) Do you agree that uniforms should be required for public school students? YES 13) Do you agree that random metal detector checks should be required in schools? YES 14) High schools are more likely to have security officers present on a regular basis as compared to elementary schools. STRONGLY AGREE 15) I feel very safe while attending my school.DISAGREE 16) What is the most important action your school and faculty members should pursue to create a safer and more comfortable learning environment? Strictly enforced discipline. Police assistance, charge a few weirdos in court-others will wake up
Kassidy Originally Answered: Survey for current public high school students on school violence?
1) Grade Level __10_____ 2) Age)___15_______ 3) Sex: FEMALE 4) How would you rate the occurrences of violence in your school? MINOR PROBLEM 5) How many violent situations can you recall witnessing or being involved in on school property within the last 30 days? _____0____ 6) To the best of your knowledge, how often do the following types of problems occur at your school? A. Student Racial Tensions… OCCASIONALLY B. Student Bullying ………... OCCASIONALLY C. Student Verbal Abuse of teachers………………. NEVER / D. Widespread Disorder Of Classrooms ………….. NEVER / E. Student Acts of Disrespect for teachers … OFTEN 7) In the last 30 days, how many times have you witnessed a teacher or other faculty member ignore altercations (verbal or physical) between students? _____10ish___ 8) During the current school year, how many times have you received detention or suspension due to a verbal or physical altercation? ___0____ 9) Describe the most effective student safety measures that you are aware of currently in place at your school. expulsion 10) Does your school use electronic surveillance to monitor activities inside the school and/or school grounds? YES/ 11) A. Do you feel that use of such electronic surveillance leads to fewer violent situations within the school setting? YES B. If you answer yes, do you also feel that using electronic surveillance in schools results in a safer learning environment? YES 12) Do you agree that uniforms should be required for public school students? NO 13) Do you agree that random metal detector checks should be required in schools? NO 14) High schools are more likely to have security officers present on a regular basis as compared to elementary schools. STRONGLY AGREE 15) I feel very safe while attending my school. AGREE 16) What is the most important action your school and faculty members should pursue to create a safer and more comfortable learning environment? ____not sure____________________________________...

Haylie Haylie
LKR is correct in everything he/she said. However I would clarify one thing: You have to have a bachelors degree and take the LSAT to apply. High school grades will not be considered. Law school admissions are almost exclusively based on your college GPA and LSAT score. You can major in any subject you like and still apply to law school, pre law is not required and most schools do not recommend it. What you do in law school more than anything is read. You read about 300-500 pages a week of thick complicated material. You read from casebooks, and depending on the length and complexity of the cases and or statutes you had to read, you will usually read about 3-7 case for each class. I would say just doing the reading consumes about 35-50 hours a week. You have to be very self motivated. You go to class just like you would in college (1 credit hour equals about 1 hour of class time). Full time students take between 14-16 credit hours per semester. Exams: You take one exam for each class at the end of the semester, each exam is about 3 or 4 hours long. They are not like other exams you have seen. They are mostly essay with some multiple choice. The multiple choice questions are long and may require you to outline the legal issues presented to answer; one MC question could take up a half a page of an exam. The essay questions are even more extreme. Law school exams don't ask, what does this law so, or is this legal, those are the easy things to learn. The essay questions on a law school exam are long "fact patterns" (2-10 pages long). It is basically a story with different legal issues arising. You have to be able to apply all of the case and statutory law you learned the entire semester to spot all of the legal issues presented by the fact situation. Most fact patterns have about 3-6 legal issues to spot, in law school this is called issue spotting. It is very important to spot all of the issues, if you miss one you get no points for that issue. For each issue most professors prefer that you follow IRAC organization; I= state the Issue, R=stat the Rule or legal principle that applies, this section can be long and require you to discuss how different case law would apply in such a situation. A=Analysis, you compare the facts with case law and statutes and determine if any factual differences in the fact pattern would change the result of any of the cases you had read. C=Conclusion, the least important part in terms of gaining points on the exam. They really don't care if you are "right" or "wrong" and more times than not there is not a right or wrong answer, they are most interested in your analysis. Grading is usually done on a strict curve, for example my law school's curve is 25% A, 30% B, 40% C, 5% D or F. Since you are going to law school with most students having a college GPA of 3.4 or higher coming in you have a bunch of people who have only gotten A's or B's there entire life, and the way the curve is set up it will not remain that way. Good grades in law school come from hard work and dedication. Best of luck, it is a long road.
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Haylie Originally Answered: I have to create a pre-school childrens' book for school. Any Ideas?
Choose an animal or animals like... Panda, Pig, and Peggy. Write about simple things: Why eating cookies gave Pig a tummy ache Why brushing your teeth is good How many piglets Pig's mommy had How Peggy feels about a new sibling Make sure you use words that aren't too hard for young kids to understand. You can also check out preschool programs or borrow some library books to get some inspiration too.
Haylie Originally Answered: I have to create a pre-school childrens' book for school. Any Ideas?
You can choose any animals to be characters...or maybe even people they know(Clifford, Nemo,etc). Manners is a good topic there are alot of manners you can use in the book.

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