5763 Shares

Is a hamster the right pet for me?

Is a hamster the right pet for me? Topic: How do you pose a research question
June 16, 2019 / By Arden
Question: I want a hamster, but I want to make sure it's the right kind of pet for me before I get one. Here are my questions: -I know the hamster's cage is going to smell sometimes, but is there any kind of spray to help with that? -When I go on vacations I don't want to have to pay a lot of money to someone to take care of my hamster. I usually go away for only a week when I do leave, so would it be ok to leave it at home and just make sure to clean it's cage and leave it some fresh food and water before I go? -About how much money would I have to spend on the hamster when I first get it? And about how much would I have to spend each month on everything I need? -I want a really small hamster that stays small all it's life. What kind would I need to get? -Do girl hamsters have periods? If so, would I need to do anything extra for it when it's on it's period? -I know hamsters are nocturnal. Does that mean I can't play with it in the daytime? -Do hamsters bite a lot? -On a scale from one to ten with ten being the hardest and one being the easiest, how hard is it to take care of a hamster? -On a scale from one to ten with ten being the most fun and one being the least fun, how much fun are hamsters as pets? That's all I can think of for now. Thanks!
Best Answer

Best Answers: Is a hamster the right pet for me?

Zadok Zadok | 3 days ago
- You may be surprised to find that a properly cared for cage and hamster produces quite a low amount of odour, and in the event of the cage spelling particularly bad, you can simply clean it more often (say every 5 days,instead of 7). There isn't any sprays available, mainly because its unfair - hamsters have poor eye sight, and depend on there sense of smell to get by and to tell that the cage they are in is really there's (that's why they get scared when you clean the cage out). - In the event of you going away for 7 days, you would need to give the cage to a family member or friend (most people oblidge once you tell them there is nothing work related invovled). Assuming you clean the cage out before you go, and provide 3 days worth of food, all the tempory owner would have to do is too feed them 3-4 more days worth of food for the remander of the week. This is nessiary as the hamster may not ration a whole 7 days worth of food, and the cage needs to be checked every night for any problems (bottle falls off,wheel falls on hamster) the water supply also needs to be changed daily to be kept fresh. - You can expect to pay about £7($10.70) for a Syrian hamster, or about £12($18.40) for a pair of dwarfs. However, the main cost is the cage - a large amount of cages, including all the cheap ones - currently available on the market are far to small, unfortunately this leads people to assume those cages must be suitable - when in reality, they are cruel. You should expect to pay £35($53) for a good cage, a good cage is a ZooZone 1 - although aquarium or bin cages often suffice. On top of that money, you would need a good wheel which costs quite a bit, and then all the toys/house. You would also need nesting material, food and substrate - which as they often are bought in bulk, are quite an investment. I would anticpate to pay £75($115) for a REAL proper fair setup. - Well, there are 5 species, 4 dwarfs and the more commonely kept Syrian. The dwarfs stay very small, about half or 1/3 of a Syrian HOWEVER it is considered unfair to only get one dwarf, as they require a friend from there litter to keep them company, and should be bought in pairs. Syrians can grow up to 7", I would research the invidual dwarf species, although Syrians are the best bet - they tame much quicker, and become more loving and cuddely, whereas dwarfs are more of a pet you observe. - No, they do not have periods as such, however upon entering there reproductive cycle - they enter 'heat' where they release a small amount of white discharge and will 'stand' *a pose* when firmly stroked, most people who have a female never even notice either of these things, you do not care for it differently at all. - They are not nocturnal, but crepsuclar, however they are similar.. dwarfs tend to have catnaps, where they have short bursts of activity during the day, whereas Syrians are more heavy sleepers. However you can still play with them, simply wake them up gently with food and then after 5 minutes begin to play - if it wasnt for this, nobody would keep hamsters. - The five species vary far to much to answer that question, however - syrians are much easier to stop biting, and once tame - never bite without cause. Dwarfs can be hard to tame, and often nip even once tame. - 4/10, (fish are 5, cats are a 7, and dogs a 9 for context) they are easy to take care of, BUT not as easy as people expect, they can require regular cleaning, lots of taming and a lot of love. - Honestly, they can be less fun then people first expect, if you do not appreciate watching any animal grow and play .. you may want to reconsider, I don't like pets that you watch (like fish) but love furries that you can play with, thats why I love Syrians - whenever my Wotsit is up, I can call her name and she will come upto the bars and hop onto my hand and play with me for ages. However, they dont require the dedication of other pets such as dogs and cats, and with them sleeping a lot .. I would have to say 4/10 for dwarfs, and 6/10 for syrians, although thats just me, and this is NOT the same for you, eg - some people hate certain kinds of pets, and are obesessed with others.
👍 254 | 👎 3
Did you like the answer? Is a hamster the right pet for me? Share with your friends

We found more questions related to the topic: How do you pose a research question


Zadok Originally Answered: Is a hamster the right pet for me?
- You may be surprised to find that a properly cared for cage and hamster produces quite a low amount of odour, and in the event of the cage spelling particularly bad, you can simply clean it more often (say every 5 days,instead of 7). There isn't any sprays available, mainly because its unfair - hamsters have poor eye sight, and depend on there sense of smell to get by and to tell that the cage they are in is really there's (that's why they get scared when you clean the cage out). - In the event of you going away for 7 days, you would need to give the cage to a family member or friend (most people oblidge once you tell them there is nothing work related invovled). Assuming you clean the cage out before you go, and provide 3 days worth of food, all the tempory owner would have to do is too feed them 3-4 more days worth of food for the remander of the week. This is nessiary as the hamster may not ration a whole 7 days worth of food, and the cage needs to be checked every night for any problems (bottle falls off,wheel falls on hamster) the water supply also needs to be changed daily to be kept fresh. - You can expect to pay about £7($10.70) for a Syrian hamster, or about £12($18.40) for a pair of dwarfs. However, the main cost is the cage - a large amount of cages, including all the cheap ones - currently available on the market are far to small, unfortunately this leads people to assume those cages must be suitable - when in reality, they are cruel. You should expect to pay £35($53) for a good cage, a good cage is a ZooZone 1 - although aquarium or bin cages often suffice. On top of that money, you would need a good wheel which costs quite a bit, and then all the toys/house. You would also need nesting material, food and substrate - which as they often are bought in bulk, are quite an investment. I would anticpate to pay £75($115) for a REAL proper fair setup. - Well, there are 5 species, 4 dwarfs and the more commonely kept Syrian. The dwarfs stay very small, about half or 1/3 of a Syrian HOWEVER it is considered unfair to only get one dwarf, as they require a friend from there litter to keep them company, and should be bought in pairs. Syrians can grow up to 7", I would research the invidual dwarf species, although Syrians are the best bet - they tame much quicker, and become more loving and cuddely, whereas dwarfs are more of a pet you observe. - No, they do not have periods as such, however upon entering there reproductive cycle - they enter 'heat' where they release a small amount of white discharge and will 'stand' *a pose* when firmly stroked, most people who have a female never even notice either of these things, you do not care for it differently at all. - They are not nocturnal, but crepsuclar, however they are similar.. dwarfs tend to have catnaps, where they have short bursts of activity during the day, whereas Syrians are more heavy sleepers. However you can still play with them, simply wake them up gently with food and then after 5 minutes begin to play - if it wasnt for this, nobody would keep hamsters. - The five species vary far to much to answer that question, however - syrians are much easier to stop biting, and once tame - never bite without cause. Dwarfs can be hard to tame, and often nip even once tame. - 4/10, (fish are 5, cats are a 7, and dogs a 9 for context) they are easy to take care of, BUT not as easy as people expect, they can require regular cleaning, lots of taming and a lot of love. - Honestly, they can be less fun then people first expect, if you do not appreciate watching any animal grow and play .. you may want to reconsider, I don't like pets that you watch (like fish) but love furries that you can play with, thats why I love Syrians - whenever my Wotsit is up, I can call her name and she will come upto the bars and hop onto my hand and play with me for ages. However, they dont require the dedication of other pets such as dogs and cats, and with them sleeping a lot .. I would have to say 4/10 for dwarfs, and 6/10 for syrians, although thats just me, and this is NOT the same for you, eg - some people hate certain kinds of pets, and are obesessed with others.

Sholto Sholto
Okay so.. For eliminating the smell, clean the cage properly about once or twice a week. If you want, you can get deodorizer for pets. Like this - http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2752676 If it's okay with you and a friend, you can ask a friend to take care of your hamster or to check on it every other day while you are on vacation. If no friends can volunteer, then I suggest: leaving more than enough food, a completely full bottle, and fresh bedding before leaving your hamster, if not more than 1 week. Before you adopt a hamster, you must know what type of breed you will be wanting, and how much your budget is for getting needed accessories for your new pet; if you are wanting just one hamster only, I suggest getting any kind of Syrian hamster. For example, a golden hamster. By the way, hamsters don't get bigger than about the size of your palm. And for cages, it depends if you want an aquarium for rodents or a cage. If you are budgeting low, I suggest getting a cage, because it usually comes with the extra items needed. If you want more security and protection from your escaping, then go with the glass aquarium. But beware: if getting a glass aquarium, do not place it over a window, same thing goes with the cage.. And no. Hamsters do not have periods. Only us humans can have that. Yes, indeed. Hamsters are nocturnal. No, it doesn't mean you can't play with it during the day time. It just means that it'll be sleeping more during the day than at night. And when at night, it'll be more active, so it will be kind of tough sleeping at nighttime. Hamsters bite, but only when you irritate them, make sudden movements to them, or holding them to tightly. On a scale from one to ten, I think it's a 4 for caring of hamsters. Hamsters are low-maintenance, meaning: it doesn't take much attention and work to care for a hamster, unlike dogs or cats. I absolutely love hamsters, I say 10 for fun of hamsters. P.S. If you get a new hamster, you mustn't give any affection to it the first 2-3 days of its new environment; it needs time to adjust to where it's now living, and when it is time, don't make any sudden pick ups. Let a bond between you and your hamster happen. Get your hamster to trust you before picking it up right away.
👍 110 | 👎 0

Oded Oded
There is no spray to help with smell, I would just clean out the cage if you think it smells too much. (You become used to the smell.) I wouldn't leave the hamster alone for a week, but, what you can do is give him food and water the day you leave and then have someone feed him in 3 days, and then you will do it again when you come home. If you get a neighbor kid to do this for you, you can give them like 3-5 dollars for coming over. Initially, your cost will be about 74 dollars. 10 for the hamster, 50 for the cage, 7 for the bedding, and 7 for food. Monthly, the cost will be about 10 dollars. I would get a Syrian. Roborovskis are smaller, but they are hyper and cannot be held. I believe female hamsters do, but I don't think you need to do anything for it. No, you can play with it in the daytime, just be careful after you've woken him or her up that he/she is not mad. (I play with mine so much she is up in the daytime and asleep at night :P) Most hamsters don't bite much at all, if they do, it doesn't hurt at all. Normally it is just like a nibble, but on occasion, it might make you bleed. I would give hamsters a 4. They are SUPER easy to care for. 9. They might not be the MOST fun animals. But they come close, and they don't cost too much. Hope this helps!
👍 108 | 👎 -3

Larkin Larkin
Hamsters are a great pet! I have two hamsters. Hamsters do bite occasionally, but that's at the beginning. It costs about thirty dollars to get a cage, food, ect. After that, it's about ten dollars a month. Hamsters can get depressed, so be gentle and handel it daily. Girl hamsters don't get periods like we do. You can barely see it. Make sure to clean it's cage once a week. You can play with your hamster anytime that you want too. Never spray anything on or around your hamster. You could make it very sick. You can't do anything about the smell, except for cleaning the cage. No hamster stays small forever, but the smallest would be a dwarf hamster. They are much more friendly. If your hamster does bite you, wash your hands good. Please don't get mad at the hamster, she has to get used to you. My hamsters are dwarf hamsters, and they are so cute! They are very fun to play with. Remember you can't train hamsters. They don't need stress. If you have a cat, then I would suggest keep the door closed for about a week. Hamsters are very easy to take care of. Remember that hamsters don't live forever. Their lifespan is about 1 to 2 years. I have a cat, two hamsters, and a guinea pig. They all get along fine. Just make sure to be good to your pet!:) Also get some toys for your hamster!:)
👍 106 | 👎 -6

Ithai Ithai
Hamsters a really great pets, and unless you are allergic to fur or hate rodents Im sure you will love to have one. I have had several hamsters in the past and breed them, so I will answer your questions... Spray - um that depends, i haven't heard of any sprays that you can use, but I have heard of ferret spray before (having said this do NOT use any spray whatsoever until you have checked that it is safe to use and don't just use air freshener deodorant because your hamster could breathe it in and damage his lungs.) Generally though, if the cage smells, it means its time to clean it out. Holidays - If your only going away for a week then it would be okay leave your hamster, as long as you cleaned him out JUST before you go and he has a big enough water bottle to last him the whole time and you have provided him with enough food for the time you will be away. Also don't give him any fresh fruit or veg because it could go bad when your away and your hamster could eat it. Hamsters are clever and usually know what they should and shouldn't eat but just to make sure. Money - that's tricky one because it depends...what you need to do is look at the prices of things like Sawdust, food, bedding (although you can just use kitchen roll/loo roll its the same thing) and chew toys and see how often you would need to buy these things. People say that you need to clean your hamster out everyday, for me this is utter rubbish. Imagine you had a brand new bedroom and you sorted it out all neatly...just the way you wanted it and then everyday somebody came in and moved it all around. To add to this, hamsters are extremely territorial, especially girl hamsters so they would eventually get really annoyed and upset that you were moving her things around unnecessarily, once a week minimum I would say, unless he is ill or smells bad that is. Breed - If you want a small hamster then you will need to get a dwaf hamster. They are great, but just to warn you they tend to not be as friendly and the bigger ones (syrian hamsters). They are generally harder to tame and hold and usually dart around thier cages really quickly. Having said this though they also make great friends. But i would advise (as you are a first time hammy owner) to buy a syrian hamster, but it's totally your choice hon. Girl Hamsters - no they dont, unlike humans, every 3/4 days, girl hamsters go "on heat" sometimes they will smell a bit, but no blood or anything visible is involved and no special care has to be taken place, just treat her the same as always. If they are "on heat" they will arch thier back and raise thier tail and stay completely still, just ignore it if this happens because unless you are a hamster breeder, she is not going to get what she wants!! :) Sleepy time - Noo you can still wake your hamster up during the day to play, just be considerate and very calm when you wake him at the start, do not grab him out of his nest, just tap on the cage (quietly) and let him come out. Biting - Untame hamsters may bite if they are either scared or being hurt. If he does, put him back in his cage and if it continues then have a look on a website to see how to "tame" your hamster. Usually the shock of it hurts more that the bite!! Hard - Not hard at all, hamsters are small and very friendly. Its good fun, and although you cant throw a stick or make him follow a peice of string, cuddling your little friend is really cute and I really hope you decide to get hamster xx Good luck and I hope I helped in some way x
👍 104 | 👎 -9

Ithai Originally Answered: How Can I convince my dad to let me get a hamster?
Show that you're responsible enough, take care of the dogs more. I have dogs and they don't care about my hamster, Gizmo. Sorry, I can't type much, my hands are tired after my homework. Good Luck!!!

If you have your own answer to the question how do you pose a research question, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.