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I want to do a Computer Science Master, however i don't know programming, can i learn later?

I want to do a Computer Science Master, however i don't know programming, can i learn later? Topic: Chemical engineering thesis
June 16, 2019 / By Asia
Question: I have a systems Engineer degree, mostly industrial and electrical controls. They teached us a lot of Maths, Physix and Chemical, digital electronic and such, but Programming was very weak, I did my Theses about Assembler Programming, Microprocessor X8086. Now i would like to study Computer Sciente Master cause i'm interested in Artificial Inteligence and internal behavior of computers. As far as i know CS has a lot of Programming in Java, C, C++, Phyton etc. My question is, according to your experience, can i learn those language and utilities during my studies in Master, or are they too heck complex and i should study programming 1 or 2 years before get in the Master?
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Best Answers: I want to do a Computer Science Master, however i don't know programming, can i learn later?

Zuph Zuph | 9 days ago
It's always wise to understand some of the curriculum before you jump into it, it'll result in a lot less work trying to get your head around it, and from what I've heard, University includes work, and lots of it. I would recommend that you learn at least one high level language (in my opinion, Python), since once you learn one it's quite easy to pick up the others, since they all mostly follow the same logic, it's just the syntax that differs. If you get a head start now then you won't have to worry about figuring out later, you could work on it in your spare time, I don't think it would require too much work. I doubt that all courses expect their students to be able to program from the get-go, but I think that everyone could use the head-start.
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Zuph Originally Answered: I want to do a Computer Science Master, however i don't know programming, can i learn later?
It's always wise to understand some of the curriculum before you jump into it, it'll result in a lot less work trying to get your head around it, and from what I've heard, University includes work, and lots of it. I would recommend that you learn at least one high level language (in my opinion, Python), since once you learn one it's quite easy to pick up the others, since they all mostly follow the same logic, it's just the syntax that differs. If you get a head start now then you won't have to worry about figuring out later, you could work on it in your spare time, I don't think it would require too much work. I doubt that all courses expect their students to be able to program from the get-go, but I think that everyone could use the head-start.
Zuph Originally Answered: I want to do a Computer Science Master, however i don't know programming, can i learn later?
for your programming you has to learn at least the basics of programming. As i am a student of Computer Science i faced the similar problem. So at least try to learn how it's work and how to give a simple command.

Solly Solly
for your programming you has to learn at least the basics of programming. As i am a student of Computer Science i faced the similar problem. So at least try to learn how it's work and how to give a simple command.
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Solly Originally Answered: Computer Science?
# question 1, done in Python 2: # input: m = int(raw_input("Enter numerator: ")) n = int(raw_input("Enter denominator: ")) # computation: q = m//n r = m%n # display results: print m, '/', n, '=', q, 'R', r The output from a run of that in Idle: Enter numerator: 17 Enter denominator: 5 17 / 5 = 3 R 2 >>> Notice how the program is divided into three sections: input, processing, and output. This is a common way to organize pieces of a program. In this case, it's actually the whole program. Now, you try these ideas on your other problems. One more hint, though: print "%d:%02d" % (8, 30) # this will display 8:30 print "%d:%02d" % (12, 1) # this will display 12:01 The % operator with a string on the left performs formatting of the items in a list or tuple on the right. You could assign the resulting string to a variable, as well, instead of just printing it.

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