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8th grade math question, what is a easy way to do this?

8th grade math question, what is a easy way to do this? Topic: Parenthesis in math problems
June 16, 2019 / By Ohndreea
Question: How can I find a easy way to know where the parentheses go in my math problems? Im trying to find a easy way to learn this, I need to put parentheses in the right place to make each statement true 1. 6-3to the 2nd powerx5-3= -42 2. 6-3to the 2nd powerx5-3= -18 3. 6- 3 to the 2nd powerx5-3= -36 4. 6-3 to the 2nd powerx5-3=-6
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Best Answers: 8th grade math question, what is a easy way to do this?

Madison Madison | 5 days ago
Try different combinations and see what you get. For example, 6-3to the 2nd powerx5-3 ((6-3)^2)*(5-3) = (3*3)*2 = 18 (no match) (((6-3)^2)*5)-3 = ((3*3)*5)-3 = 42 (no match) Since these are all positive, you can give up on them. 6-((3^2)*5)-3 = 6-((3*3)*5)-3 = -42 (match!) Wow, this is hard... are there other matches?!?
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Madison Originally Answered: 8th grade math question, what is a easy way to do this?
Try different combinations and see what you get. For example, 6-3to the 2nd powerx5-3 ((6-3)^2)*(5-3) = (3*3)*2 = 18 (no match) (((6-3)^2)*5)-3 = ((3*3)*5)-3 = 42 (no match) Since these are all positive, you can give up on them. 6-((3^2)*5)-3 = 6-((3*3)*5)-3 = -42 (match!) Wow, this is hard... are there other matches?!?
Madison Originally Answered: 8th grade math question, what is a easy way to do this?
1. 6 - (3^2 x 5) - 3 = (-42) 2. [(6 - 3^2) x 5] - 3 = (-18) 3. 6 - [(3^2 x 5) - 3] = (-36) 4. (6 - 3^2) x (5 - 3) = (-6) There's really no proper way to do this except for trial & error. You have to figure out different groupings and patterns for the numbers. And by the way, using just parentheses here isn't enough. You need to use brackets too to group numbers that are grouped with parentheses. (:

Kenya Kenya
1. 6 - (3^2 x 5) - 3 = (-42) 2. [(6 - 3^2) x 5] - 3 = (-18) 3. 6 - [(3^2 x 5) - 3] = (-36) 4. (6 - 3^2) x (5 - 3) = (-6) There's really no proper way to do this except for trial & error. You have to figure out different groupings and patterns for the numbers. And by the way, using just parentheses here isn't enough. You need to use brackets too to group numbers that are grouped with parentheses. (:
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Kenya Originally Answered: Help in 7th grade math 10 points?
Look at the bigger picture. You'll only have this teacher for a year so do what she wants so you can get into the advanced classs. Show all your work. Do every homework question. This won't be the first time you have a teacher or boss who is difficult.
Kenya Originally Answered: Help in 7th grade math 10 points?
As someone who loves writing things down and working on them till i get a solution it is easy for me to say this, and from what you say about yourself it sounds like you are the opposite. All your teacher is saying is "write it down" so she can see your work. this is a VERY good habit to get into. 7th grade math is still at the easy-stage. by that i mean you can pretty much do it all in your head, and the problems they choose work out to "easy numbers", but as you get older and start to enjoy different branches of mathematics, you will find the problems become more real world-like and less easily worked out. So if you get into the good habit now of showing your work step by step you will be well prepared for when the mathematics becomes really engrossing and takes 3 or 4 pages of equations and figuring out. I know it seems silly to have to do it now, but your teacher is just trying to prepare you for the future. My advice would be just start writing it all down. .. and who knows if you really write out the last 2 that you were having a problem with you might (a) get the right answers, or (b) at least get credit for completely showing your work, and she can show you were you went wrong. Good luck!

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