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Physics problem in circular motion?

Physics problem in circular motion? Topic: Problem solving in physics work
June 16, 2019 / By Arleen
Question: Hi. Im having problems with this physics porblem/ The gravitational force between two sumo wrestlers is 2.82 x 10^-3N. One of the wrestlers has a mass of 171kg, what is the mass of the other wrestler? All of my formulas need a radius to work but no radius is given so Im stuck. Help please. There is no picture and I copied the problem straight from the worksheet.
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Best Answers: Physics problem in circular motion?

Zebulon Zebulon | 1 day ago
Without knowing the distance between the sumo wrestlers, it's impossible to determine the mass of the other sumo wrestler. You simply don't have enough data to solve this problem. If the wrestlers were five feet apart the wrestler would weigh a heck of a lot more than if they were ten feet apart. One thing a lot of problems like this do is put a little bit of extra information in a diagram of some sort. It's possible they did that here. I'd doublecheck your question and see if they hid the extra information you need somewhere sneaky.
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Zebulon Originally Answered: Physics problem in circular motion?
Without knowing the distance between the sumo wrestlers, it's impossible to determine the mass of the other sumo wrestler. You simply don't have enough data to solve this problem. If the wrestlers were five feet apart the wrestler would weigh a heck of a lot more than if they were ten feet apart. One thing a lot of problems like this do is put a little bit of extra information in a diagram of some sort. It's possible they did that here. I'd doublecheck your question and see if they hid the extra information you need somewhere sneaky.

Zebulon Originally Answered: Physics Problem I don't understand?
Ice heat of fusion = Lf = 79.7 cal/g-C water specific heat = cw = 1 cal/g-C heat to ice mass = heat from water mass 80*Lf + cw*80(Te - 0) = cw*825*(25-Te) 6376 + 80Te = 20625 - 825Te solving for Te Te = 15.775 °C "equilibrium temperature" Rounding: Te = 16 °C
Zebulon Originally Answered: Physics Problem I don't understand?
I don't think it's possible to find Q without the temperatures.. But I think this is how you would do it. Q=MC(delta)T and for state chages, Q = mL (delta)T = T_final - T_initial and Q_hot = -Q_cold. You are trying to find T_final. Q(25*water) - Q(ice-->water) - Q(ice-water) = 0 M(water)xC(water)x(T_final-25*C) - M(ice)xLatent heat of fusion - M(ice)xC(water)x(T_final-0*C) Does that make sense? Try plugging in the values you know, then you solve for T_final (I don't know if it matters if your temp. is in Kelvin). Sorry it's a little messy, just shoot me an email if you need more help.

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