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My 2 yr old is out of control! Please help me?

My 2 yr old is out of control! Please help me? Topic: Learn how to write papers for kids
June 16, 2019 / By Diamanda
Question: My 2 yr old son has always been different. I don't know how to describe it except for try to type it out on here and hopefully search for some answers. And pray someone can help me I discipline my son by smacking his bottom and also by time outs. First I always try the time out. About 6 months ago my family and I were moving I told my son not to mess with the desk. He didnt listen I did time out and then he did it again. I spanked his butt. Then I thought he got the picture. He didnt he pulled the desk down on his hand and fractured it. I had dcf investigate me. hen the case was closed. He has tried putting my cats in the dryer I have caught him many times doing this. He torments my 1 yr old. He just tryed setting my home on fire once again! He puts paper plates in the microwave and turns it on! I didnt even hear him do it! I have tryed and tryed over and over again to help my son! I am a good mom! I watch my kids! I just dont what to do anymore! I play with both my kids all the time. Here is some more info in case he gets bloody noses frequently his eyes roll a lot He lines things up perfectly then gets mad is you touch them or move them out of place He likes to be clean and gets mad if he gets dirt on his hand he smacks himself in the head I have brought this up to his pediatrician they say oh its normal 2 yr old behavior. I dont think this is normal. At first I thought it was autism or something I dont know what to think anymore. PLEASE DONT JUDGE ME I AM JUST TRYING TO FIND HELP! I AM A GOOD MOM I LOOK AFTER MY KIDS AND PLAY WITH THEM ALL THE TIME. I have tryed professional counseling. they say hes fine! But, he just doesnt listen! Its starting to scare me now. I am wondering if it could be ADD OR ADDHD?
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Best Answers: My 2 yr old is out of control! Please help me?

Caprina Caprina | 1 day ago
You are right! This is NOT normal two-year-old behavior. Document, document, document (that means write EVERYTHING down, even minor stuff). Get a spiral notebook or something so you can keep it with you at all times. Tie a pen to it so you don't have to keep finding one when you need it. Write down what happens and what seems to trigger it. Write down what he eats and drinks. The more information the doctor has, the more useful it will be. Be sure and date everything you write. Also write down how it made you feel/react, how you/others responded, and how well it worked. You may find some patterns to help you until you can get professional help. When you do, you are also less likely to hear "let's keep an eye on things and see what happens." You will already have the records that SHOW what's happening. Change pediatricians, since this one doesn't listen, and get a referral to a child psychiatrist from the new one. There are those who will charge on a sliding scale, if you need that. You can get safety latches from a hardware store or Safety1st.com (don't spell it out, that's a different company). The kind that will work for your microwave is an oven latch. That kind might work for the dryer also. Baby gates might be a good idea, depending on how your house/apartment is built. The kind of cabinet latches that go over the cabinet knobs work well. If your cabinet doesn't have knobs, you can install them easily and they don't cost much. Safety doorknob covers can keep him out of places he shouldn't be, keep him in his room, or in the house. We have them all over to keep our three-year-old budding engineer out of trouble. Make sure you childproof his room, then put one on the INSIDE doorknob of his room, so you have a safe place to put him when needed. You can also get covers for stove knobs, and that's probably wise, since he seems to like fire. Keep the paper plates out of reach. Oh, and DON'T assume anything is too high. Our son learned at an early age how to drag chairs over and climb on them to reach whatever he's going for. I should tell you that someone flamed me once for recommending putting a doorknob cover on the inside of a child's door, in case of fire. She was wrong. Young children don't run away from fire, they HIDE from it, usually under the bed or in the closet, and if there is a fire, you need to be able to find your child! (My husband has been a firefighter for over fifteen years.) I'm sure you ARE a good mother. Your precious child needs YOU to find him help. Don't let him down. I mean it about the pediatrician. If he won't give you a referral, find a new pediatrician. I've been through doctors that don't listen, and now that I've found a good one who does, I recommend her to everyone! This is really important, for your two-year-old AND for the SAFETY of the rest of you, especially his younger sibling. That one's relying on you, too! If you haven't thought about it, it might be a good idea not to have any more children for a while, until you know what's going on with your first one and have found a way to deal with it. You don't want to put another child at risk, and you know how pregnancy takes it out of you, so you wouldn't be able to supervise your present children as closely. If by chance you find yourself pregnant, get help from friends and family. Don't try to be heroic and do it alone. Your children don't need Superwoman, they need you to take care of yourself and them. You are doing the right thing to find help for your son. Keep after it. YOU know your children better than any one, and if YOU think there is a problem, you are almost certainly right! Start documenting as soon as you get off the computer. It will take a little while to jump through the hoops to get your child some help, so you will have plenty to give them when the time comes. If there is anything I can help with, please send me an email through Y!A.
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Caprina Originally Answered: My 2 yr old is out of control! Please help me?
You are right! This is NOT normal two-year-old behavior. Document, document, document (that means write EVERYTHING down, even minor stuff). Get a spiral notebook or something so you can keep it with you at all times. Tie a pen to it so you don't have to keep finding one when you need it. Write down what happens and what seems to trigger it. Write down what he eats and drinks. The more information the doctor has, the more useful it will be. Be sure and date everything you write. Also write down how it made you feel/react, how you/others responded, and how well it worked. You may find some patterns to help you until you can get professional help. When you do, you are also less likely to hear "let's keep an eye on things and see what happens." You will already have the records that SHOW what's happening. Change pediatricians, since this one doesn't listen, and get a referral to a child psychiatrist from the new one. There are those who will charge on a sliding scale, if you need that. You can get safety latches from a hardware store or Safety1st.com (don't spell it out, that's a different company). The kind that will work for your microwave is an oven latch. That kind might work for the dryer also. Baby gates might be a good idea, depending on how your house/apartment is built. The kind of cabinet latches that go over the cabinet knobs work well. If your cabinet doesn't have knobs, you can install them easily and they don't cost much. Safety doorknob covers can keep him out of places he shouldn't be, keep him in his room, or in the house. We have them all over to keep our three-year-old budding engineer out of trouble. Make sure you childproof his room, then put one on the INSIDE doorknob of his room, so you have a safe place to put him when needed. You can also get covers for stove knobs, and that's probably wise, since he seems to like fire. Keep the paper plates out of reach. Oh, and DON'T assume anything is too high. Our son learned at an early age how to drag chairs over and climb on them to reach whatever he's going for. I should tell you that someone flamed me once for recommending putting a doorknob cover on the inside of a child's door, in case of fire. She was wrong. Young children don't run away from fire, they HIDE from it, usually under the bed or in the closet, and if there is a fire, you need to be able to find your child! (My husband has been a firefighter for over fifteen years.) I'm sure you ARE a good mother. Your precious child needs YOU to find him help. Don't let him down. I mean it about the pediatrician. If he won't give you a referral, find a new pediatrician. I've been through doctors that don't listen, and now that I've found a good one who does, I recommend her to everyone! This is really important, for your two-year-old AND for the SAFETY of the rest of you, especially his younger sibling. That one's relying on you, too! If you haven't thought about it, it might be a good idea not to have any more children for a while, until you know what's going on with your first one and have found a way to deal with it. You don't want to put another child at risk, and you know how pregnancy takes it out of you, so you wouldn't be able to supervise your present children as closely. If by chance you find yourself pregnant, get help from friends and family. Don't try to be heroic and do it alone. Your children don't need Superwoman, they need you to take care of yourself and them. You are doing the right thing to find help for your son. Keep after it. YOU know your children better than any one, and if YOU think there is a problem, you are almost certainly right! Start documenting as soon as you get off the computer. It will take a little while to jump through the hoops to get your child some help, so you will have plenty to give them when the time comes. If there is anything I can help with, please send me an email through Y!A.

Amethyst Amethyst
My son has some of these traits and iv also been told its normal. However, I also have a friend who has ADHD, as does her brother and I see a lot of that behaviour coming out on them. It sadly cannot be diagnosed until they are 5 here in the UK. I don't know where you are but if he has it then no amount of discipline will help much at all. It's not something they can control. My son slaps his face to keep himself awake despite being shattered, wakes during the night for hours at a time, slaps his stomach, runs round like a headless chicken, throws food, toys and anything else, throws the most amazing tantrums, has a VERY short attention span even for a 2 year old and is so hyper its unreal. I have a daughter too, they are twins, both have been cleared of autism (with twins there's an increased chance of it). Both throw tantrums, this is normal unfortunately lol but she is more patient, calmer in general, throws toys now and then though when she has time outs she apologises afterwards and won't do it again seconds later unlike my son. Iv been told by some that its just a boy thing and that when they start school it calms them down but others seem as worried as me. They have just turned 2 last month.
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Ward Ward
It does sound like he has more going on then you know. All of the things you said are 'typical behavior' at one time or another for a 2 year old.. but combined.. and the frequency of it is what isn't typical. I also thought autism at first, or aspbergers. There are many signs and smyptoms of those conditions. ADHD could also be a possibility. I suggest you make a list of the frequency and and any odd behavior he exhibits so you can show your doctor. Some other behaviors that are 'typical' but can also indicate conditions are constant persistance, constant temper tantrums, torturing others, and not playing with other children or interacting with them appropriately. Now of course every 2 year old has these qualities at one time or another but the frequency and intensity is so important to tell your doctor
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Russell Russell
It sounds pretty normal to me - all the males in my family behaved like this (and one or two still do). Even the odd behaviours are probably just something he'll outgrow as soon as you stop worrying about them. You even have two health professionals who independently say there is nothing wrong with your boy. Believe them for now at least. What you have there is a very active, inquisitive and demanding little boy. He sounds quite fun but probably exhausting if you have to look after other children as well - and that might be the real problem. He needs more attention than you can give him. Can you get out of the house every day to the park or beach or anywhere where he can run around and explore? He needs constant activity, so go to all the free and cheap places - museums, supermarket ball ponds, toddler groups, playgrounds, restaurants, train rides, bouncy castles, swimming. It sounds like he'll enjoy the lot! Get his dad to take him out too, or stay in and do "boy stuff" like playing in the mud - boys need dads, or a good male role model if their dad isn't around. Let the housework go if you have to - you can have a tidy house when the children are grown up. For now just settle for "won't make them ill". You won't regret it. Word to the wise - the discipline you're using doesn't work on infants. He hasn't figured out cause and effect properly yet. When you catch him doing something wrong keep calm and stop him. Be very firm so he knows you're not messing about, "you do not use the microwave" and then give him something more fun to do. Really I think he was just trying to cook - same as you do. As for the cats - let him try and put them in the tumble dryer but be ready with soap and a plaster to clean any scratches he gets. Toddlers always torment their younger siblings - I was ghastly to my sister and couldn't be left alone with her.
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Moses Moses
I think his behaviour is quite extreme for a 2 year old. You should get a second opinion asap. And keep going to the doctors if they don't listen. The sooner he gets help the better
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Moses Originally Answered: Birth control help please?
The pill can be prescribed by your regular pediatrician/family doctor, or a gynecologist, or you can get it from a family-planning clinic like Planned Parenthood. What kind of 'hormonal problems' do you have that you think the pill will benefit? At 15 your hormones and cycles are still getting established and settled, and it's usually not wise to mess things up by taking a lot of artificial hormones unless there is some other reason (like the need for birth control) to do so. So the doctor will probably NOT recommend that you get pills if your only reason for wanting them is slightly irregular periods, or acne. The former is normal, there are better ways of treating the latter. And going on the pill *just in case* you decide to have sex in the future isn't very sensible either. If/when you and your boyfriend decide you are ready for sex, you will discuss it and plan for it. You will buy (and use) condoms. And if you also, at that point, want to do on the pill, you can cross that bridge at the time. The doctor's visit, if you see your regular doctor, will be submitted to your insurance, unless you are willing/able to pay out of pocket. So your parents WILL find out that you've gone to the doctor. Planned Parenthood will not tell them. So far as I know, most insurance plans don't send statements for prescription drug purchases, but you'll probably need to have your own insurance card to bring to the pharmacy. Seriously, if you want birth control for non-contraceptive reasons, you should not feel ashamed or embarrassed to talk to your mother about it. If you have very erratic periods, or bad acne, or whatever else, she presumably already knows about it.

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