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Basset hound puppy questions.?

Basset hound puppy questions.? Topic: Case systems lab furniture
June 16, 2019 / By Corynn
Question: I have raised about 5 dogs in my lifetime, but never a breed akin to the basset hound that i just picked up saturday. aside from the normal puppy requirements, does anyone know of any breed specific tips on raising? i.e. : "suggested food, cleaning, medical worries to keep an eye on". she is a very happy and healthy 9 week old purebred basset hound. loves to bawl at our cat, and is already in love with my 5 year old black lab. thanks.
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Best Answers: Basset hound puppy questions.?

Bethney Bethney | 3 days ago
Hah, where to start...... as the only other breed I've reared is my Whippet, I can't compare raising Bassets to other breeds and I'd suggest the basics are not different. However, being a hound does make them 'different' as far as temperament is concerned, and of course, structure. Once you get inside their heads, so you understand what makes them tick, they are not difficult. Think applied psychology and you are 99.9% there. Bassets do best on plain food and it helps when it comes to training that they are food motivated, second only to hunting.. They do best having company - this is NOT a breed to be left alone for hours. They can't be forced to do anything, in fact (applied psychology again) the secret is to make them think what you want them to do, was their idea all along. They may not be the fastest in terms of 'getting it', but once they have, it sticks. If you try to push too much on them, too fast, they retreat into their shell, which is where the apparent stubbornness comes in - it's not being stubborn, it's just giving up. And it's easy to do. The bitches are less inclined to panic when faced with more than they can cope with however. It's easy to demolish a male, but not so much the females. I hope your breeder has given you a diet sheet, and a small supply of the food she's been eating - they can have sensitive digestive systems so it's best to find a good food, and stick with it. The food shouldn't be high in protein however - more isn't better, with this breed. They should be on a puppy food that's no higher in protein than 28%. My recent buy in (well he's 2 now) was reared on Royal Canin and grew way too big, to fast, with growth problems as a result. Be very careful with her when it comes to exercise. For the first 6 months she should only go on short controlled walks, although she can run around as much, within common sense, as she wants to. Bassets can dig their heels in if they've had enough - the crashing to the ground, won't move, thing. Don't tug her around - she knows best. Once you get past 6 months, you can start to increase her walks, building up muscles to support that heavy bone until by a year, she should be ready to do whatever you are prepared to do with her. She will need FENCING - this is a hunting breed, and her nose will lead, given the chance. Keep her completely off stairs for now. And that includes jumping on furniture, especially off (and down stairs). It's all too easy to wreck their fronts especially unless you take extreme care. Keep her ears clean (inside) - ears and nails once a week. You may notice a houndy smell - if this becomes offensive, then she may have a yeast infection which this breed is rather prone to (some lines). This is a breed prone to GDV (bloat/torsion) so as an adult, it's best to keep to a two-meal a day schedule, and no exercise for 2 hours after feeding, or feeding for one hour after exercise - vital. Some lines suffer with epilepsy. Von Willibrands (bleeding disorder) runs in some lines too. Glaucoma is around in the breed also. More recently cases of Panosteitis have been seen. This is the so-called creeping disease which can affect youngsters around 8 months - symptoms show lameness, and pain, on different legs, not just the one. The good news with that is they grow out of it much as some vets will think it's Hip, or Elbow dysplasia, if they are not aware of this in the breed. It's controlled with buffered aspirin. Contrary to popular belief, Bassets do NOT suffer with back problems. Of course there may be the odd exception, but as a rule this is not the problem it is with Dachshunds. I'd better stop - there are many good books available on the breed - and always remember her breeder should be there to answer breed-specific questions you may have. Nobody knows the breed better than those who have been involved with them, for years. You might consider joining the BHCA (if you are in America, as showing?) - it helps to be around like-minded people!! Have fun and welcome to the unique world of the Basset. Add I'd leave my email contact open but I've been receiving unwanted messages from some idiot so I prefer only to open my contact, when I think somebody needs to 'speak' off here! If you do, put an edit on here and I'll open it.
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Bethney Originally Answered: Basset hound puppy questions.?
Hah, where to start...... as the only other breed I've reared is my Whippet, I can't compare raising Bassets to other breeds and I'd suggest the basics are not different. However, being a hound does make them 'different' as far as temperament is concerned, and of course, structure. Once you get inside their heads, so you understand what makes them tick, they are not difficult. Think applied psychology and you are 99.9% there. Bassets do best on plain food and it helps when it comes to training that they are food motivated, second only to hunting.. They do best having company - this is NOT a breed to be left alone for hours. They can't be forced to do anything, in fact (applied psychology again) the secret is to make them think what you want them to do, was their idea all along. They may not be the fastest in terms of 'getting it', but once they have, it sticks. If you try to push too much on them, too fast, they retreat into their shell, which is where the apparent stubbornness comes in - it's not being stubborn, it's just giving up. And it's easy to do. The bitches are less inclined to panic when faced with more than they can cope with however. It's easy to demolish a male, but not so much the females. I hope your breeder has given you a diet sheet, and a small supply of the food she's been eating - they can have sensitive digestive systems so it's best to find a good food, and stick with it. The food shouldn't be high in protein however - more isn't better, with this breed. They should be on a puppy food that's no higher in protein than 28%. My recent buy in (well he's 2 now) was reared on Royal Canin and grew way too big, to fast, with growth problems as a result. Be very careful with her when it comes to exercise. For the first 6 months she should only go on short controlled walks, although she can run around as much, within common sense, as she wants to. Bassets can dig their heels in if they've had enough - the crashing to the ground, won't move, thing. Don't tug her around - she knows best. Once you get past 6 months, you can start to increase her walks, building up muscles to support that heavy bone until by a year, she should be ready to do whatever you are prepared to do with her. She will need FENCING - this is a hunting breed, and her nose will lead, given the chance. Keep her completely off stairs for now. And that includes jumping on furniture, especially off (and down stairs). It's all too easy to wreck their fronts especially unless you take extreme care. Keep her ears clean (inside) - ears and nails once a week. You may notice a houndy smell - if this becomes offensive, then she may have a yeast infection which this breed is rather prone to (some lines). This is a breed prone to GDV (bloat/torsion) so as an adult, it's best to keep to a two-meal a day schedule, and no exercise for 2 hours after feeding, or feeding for one hour after exercise - vital. Some lines suffer with epilepsy. Von Willibrands (bleeding disorder) runs in some lines too. Glaucoma is around in the breed also. More recently cases of Panosteitis have been seen. This is the so-called creeping disease which can affect youngsters around 8 months - symptoms show lameness, and pain, on different legs, not just the one. The good news with that is they grow out of it much as some vets will think it's Hip, or Elbow dysplasia, if they are not aware of this in the breed. It's controlled with buffered aspirin. Contrary to popular belief, Bassets do NOT suffer with back problems. Of course there may be the odd exception, but as a rule this is not the problem it is with Dachshunds. I'd better stop - there are many good books available on the breed - and always remember her breeder should be there to answer breed-specific questions you may have. Nobody knows the breed better than those who have been involved with them, for years. You might consider joining the BHCA (if you are in America, as showing?) - it helps to be around like-minded people!! Have fun and welcome to the unique world of the Basset. Add I'd leave my email contact open but I've been receiving unwanted messages from some idiot so I prefer only to open my contact, when I think somebody needs to 'speak' off here! If you do, put an edit on here and I'll open it.
Bethney Originally Answered: Basset hound puppy questions.?
Hi, i think the show dogs are bigger and muscular because those dogs are not neutered:the males have testicles,the females have their ovaries!Show people also exercise their dogs:some even buy treadmills made for dogs! The other option:look at this breed, a relative of the basset hound a bit bigger(longer legs) and higher energy:PBGV (Petite Basset Griffon Vandeen).These dogs are actually still used for hunting!

Aglæca Aglæca
Hi, i think the show dogs are bigger and muscular because those dogs are not neutered:the males have testicles,the females have their ovaries!Show people also exercise their dogs:some even buy treadmills made for dogs! The other option:look at this breed, a relative of the basset hound a bit bigger(longer legs) and higher energy:PBGV (Petite Basset Griffon Vandeen).These dogs are actually still used for hunting!
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Aglæca Originally Answered: I might be getting a puppy from a shelter tomorrow and i have some questions?
Honestly, when I look at any dog I get a special feeling inside! But I don't think it's how many people imagine it - you don't walk up to a litter of puppies and just know, just like that. You might find yourself attached to the smallest one, the most active one, the leader of the litter, but it won't be something you feel is right. If you're going with a puppy from a breeder, any reputable breeder should have already done temperament tests on the dog and health tests and all you have to do is to tell the breeder what characteristics in a dog you are looking for and he will pick out the one that most matches you and your family. However, if your breeder does not do that, there probably isn't much I can say to let you find a new breeder. So, instead I'll say - pick out the healthiest of the bunch, mentally and physically. A healthy puppy should have nice fur, small, white teeth, pink gums, bright eyes (no crusts), and a moist, but not running, nose. The pup should be happily interacting with other pups and not too shy of new toys or people, and willing to go up to you. Never pick the shyest of the litter, and never pick the little alpha, either. Both might end up with behavioral difficulties, and you want your dog to be the best suited for you if it is your first. These are just some quick notes to keep in mind. But no matter how you feel about the dog you get, and even if you get mad at the puppy when it's being a puppy and getting underfoot, just give it the love and resources it needs, and everytime you look at your dog, you WILL get a special feeling inside.
Aglæca Originally Answered: I might be getting a puppy from a shelter tomorrow and i have some questions?
Well, the kennel should have it's health records on shots and infections. If the dog's ribs are easily felt underneath the skin and only slightly seen by the naked eye, then it's at a healthy weight and if it seems lively and happy will also tell you how healthy it is.

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