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Is the career Anesthesiology a demanding career?

Is the career Anesthesiology a demanding career? Topic: Medical writing as a career
June 16, 2019 / By Cherilyn
Question: i want to know is the career worth the money. will it be boring along the way. is it easy to find a job from such career.
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Best Answers: Is the career Anesthesiology a demanding career?

Ashley Ashley | 10 days ago
Have you considered becoming a nurse anesthestist? (sp??) They are required to complete nursing school, usually a BSN then go to graduate school and study the advanced field of anesthesiology. The pay is very good, one of the highest paying in the medical field and the responsibility is great. The nurse anesthestist I know makes about $170,000 a year and writes his own schedule (around surgeries) and is the one in charge of all airway in the operating room. He answers to an anesthesiologist (MD), but has the liberty to run the OR as he pleases and was trained. Very liberating field. PS, I'd think that any field you chose wouldn't be "boring" along the way. To be an anesthesiologist (MD) you get your bachelors degree in anything, usually science related (biology, chemistry) then apply to medical school (4 years). Once you finish med school, you apply to a number of teaching hospitals for residency. You go where you get accepted. Spend 3 years in residency (sometimes 4) then 2 years as an anesthesiology fellow (working mainly in anesthesiology). If you want to become on staff full time, you apply for a staff position and are called an attending physician. It is a long haul. If interested, I'd go the bachelor of science in nursing, get excellent grades, then start working as a nurse. (you have your bachelor's degree - first step of MD process). Get your masters in anesthesiology - and start working (usually a three year program but you can work in the field as a nurse while you are in grad school). then, if you want to go the route of MD, go to med school after that, but you can short cut your way by doing the nurse anesthesia route and if you don't like it, you are still a nurse and can switch and work in any field. Good luck.
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Ashley Originally Answered: Is the career Anesthesiology a demanding career?
Have you considered becoming a nurse anesthestist? (sp??) They are required to complete nursing school, usually a BSN then go to graduate school and study the advanced field of anesthesiology. The pay is very good, one of the highest paying in the medical field and the responsibility is great. The nurse anesthestist I know makes about $170,000 a year and writes his own schedule (around surgeries) and is the one in charge of all airway in the operating room. He answers to an anesthesiologist (MD), but has the liberty to run the OR as he pleases and was trained. Very liberating field. PS, I'd think that any field you chose wouldn't be "boring" along the way. To be an anesthesiologist (MD) you get your bachelors degree in anything, usually science related (biology, chemistry) then apply to medical school (4 years). Once you finish med school, you apply to a number of teaching hospitals for residency. You go where you get accepted. Spend 3 years in residency (sometimes 4) then 2 years as an anesthesiology fellow (working mainly in anesthesiology). If you want to become on staff full time, you apply for a staff position and are called an attending physician. It is a long haul. If interested, I'd go the bachelor of science in nursing, get excellent grades, then start working as a nurse. (you have your bachelor's degree - first step of MD process). Get your masters in anesthesiology - and start working (usually a three year program but you can work in the field as a nurse while you are in grad school). then, if you want to go the route of MD, go to med school after that, but you can short cut your way by doing the nurse anesthesia route and if you don't like it, you are still a nurse and can switch and work in any field. Good luck.

Zerah Zerah
Very boring, typically described akin to being an airline pilot.....many days of boredom with every now and then a few hours of sheer terror. Also many anesthesiologists are frustrated surgeons, thinking they know everything about surgery but humiliated when the surgeon barks at them about the patient squirming on the OR table when supposed to be asleep. Not a bad job though, punch in and punch out like a factory worker with decent pay, only no self esteem.
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Skyler Skyler
The median salary is quite high. Does $300,000 a year sound good to you? Yes, it's quite demanding and the screening process is rigorous. If you're not at the top of your class in medical school, it's difficult to get a position. Working hours can be 60+ a week. Insurance is extremely expensive. There's nothing worse than being sued for malpractice. http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos074.htm
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Ormond Ormond
Being an anesthesiologist is one of the highest paying jobs in the medical profession. However, it does take many years to become a certified MD and it is not an easy task.
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Leighton Leighton
If you're going into it for the money, keep looking. Those of us who ACTUALLY PRACTICE the specialty find it quite interesting. Yes, it's demanding and stressful, but it can also be a lot of fun. I love my job, and think it was well worth the years spent training for it.
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Jadyn Jadyn
It is a lot of pay, but they have one of the highest costing malpractice insurance levels of all doctors. Money in, money out.
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Jadyn Originally Answered: Cosmetology and healthcare career? combining cosmetology and healthcare career for bussiness?
Print this article A cosmetology business is unique because you can work from almost any space, from your own home (with the proper licenses) to an upscale salon. Cosmetology encompasses many avenues of the beauty industry, including hairstyling, nails, skin care and makeup. A cosmetologist can perform one or all of these services as a licensed professional. Licensing If you are starting a cosmetology business in a salon or spa and are working as an independent contractor (which means that you are an independent business within another person's business), the only license you need is your state cosmetology license. A state cosmetology license is issued following the completion of formal cosmetology training and a passing score on the state licensing exam. If you are going to start a cosmetology business on your own, perhaps in your own home or in your own workspace, you will need a small business license as well. Small business licenses are often issued by the city or county where you will be working and can be obtained after filling out paperwork as well as paying a fee (fees vary by location). Tools Tools are an essential part of any cosmetology business. Without them, you will be unable to perform client services. For example, if you are planning to do hair, be sure to have a set of combs, brushes, scissors, styling tools, clips, coloring brushes, bowls and bottles. If you are going to work on nails or makeup, make sure you have a basic set of tools for all of the processes you will perform. Check with your employer (if you will be working at a salon) to see if she provides any tools for your business. In addition, a cosmetologist should also be prepared with cleaning and disenfecting items according to the regulations for your state. If you are starting your own cosmetology business at home or in a new workspace, you will need to purchase hydraulic salon chairs, stations, mirrors, sinks, shampoo chairs, a reception desk/area and a credit card machine (if you plan to take credit cards in addition to checks and cash). The majority of these items can be purchased from salon suppliers such as Sally Beauty Supply or Salon Interiors. Supplies Supplies such as hair products, makeup, skincare products and chemical ingredients are also an important factor in any cosmetology business. You can purchase these supplies at professional beauty supply stores such as Maly's West and Cosmoprof stores. Since these stores are professional beauty supply stores, their prices are wholesale, and you need to show your license to make purchases. Workplace Workplaces are as different as cosmetologists themselves. Some cosmetologists choose to work freelance, while others work in salons. Choose your workplace by how you want to run your cosmetology business. Freelance cosmetologists can find work through a union if they are in one or through ads in your local newspaper or city website. If you have clientele already, you may want to start by renting a station at a salon or spa. By renting a station, you are an independent contractor who pays a weekly or monthly rental fee for use of a workspace in a salon or spa. Let your clients know that you have begun working at a salon or spa by sending out mailers or email notices. You can also choose to work either as an employee who is paid an hourly wage or as a commissioned employee who earns a preset commission on the services you perform and the products you sell. Expert Insight The website, StyleCareer.com says that professional hair care is a growing business. Sales revenues for salons are increasing, and Clairol estimates that 55 percent of all American women color their hair, with 20 percent getting their hair colored professionally. That figure is supposed to rise in the coming years, so if you are considering starting a cosmetology business, now looks like a good time to do so. As a matter of fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that personal appearance workers will grow by 20 percent from 2008 to 2018, which is much faster than the average for all occupations. This growth is due to an increasing population, leading to greater demand for hair services. Additionally, the demand for hair coloring and other advanced hair treatments has increased in recent years, particularly among baby boomers and young people. This trend is expected to continue, leading to a favorable outlook for hairdressers, hairstylists and cosmetologis Read more: What Do You Need to Start a Cosmetology Business? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_6646647_do-need-start-cosmetology-business_.html#ixzz1XCmRayDP

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