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Pros & cons of being a nurse, specifically LVN?

Pros & cons of being a nurse, specifically LVN? Topic: Benefits of no homework
June 17, 2019 / By Jenae
Question: i want to be a teacher, but to become a teacher i must go through five years of college and then go for my teaching credentials. my parents want me to become an LVN nurse because there is a local school that will allow me to become an LVN in 18 months and also because LVN has a lot better pay. My parents think it is a waste to pay so much to go to school for 5-6 years to become a teacher who doesn't get paid much. so i am trying to persuade myself to become a nurse, though i really don't like the hospital environment. please help me and give me reasons to want to become a nurse.
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Best Answers: Pros & cons of being a nurse, specifically LVN?

Felisha Felisha | 4 days ago
My G/F is an RN, I am an EMT. She gets around 45K a year (give or take) She JUST passed her NY State R.N. license test like this past month to. A teacher with a LOT of experience, is lucky if they make it to that much. Starting is around $28,500 or so. Special education gets more but still looking at early $30,000's. So nursing is MUCH more profitable. Even as a LVN/LPN you can still make a good buck. Health care is solid, people always need Doctor's Nurses, Paramedics, etc. People also need teachers for K-12, but they have a 3 year or so ten-yer period where after that the school can just let them go, no questions asked,(again in NY state). Nurses are done at the end of their shift and go home. Teachers go home and grade homework, plan the next day, look up a topic for class, attend PTA meetings, deal with "difficult" children (babysit), .....etc. Nurses have benefits from their employer, teachers have a union, (NY State k-12) In the end of the day, a nurse will get more money, and possible better, benefits. But you need to deal with sick, old people, or bratty spoiled kids.
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Felisha Originally Answered: Pros & cons of being a nurse, specifically LVN?
My G/F is an RN, I am an EMT. She gets around 45K a year (give or take) She JUST passed her NY State R.N. license test like this past month to. A teacher with a LOT of experience, is lucky if they make it to that much. Starting is around $28,500 or so. Special education gets more but still looking at early $30,000's. So nursing is MUCH more profitable. Even as a LVN/LPN you can still make a good buck. Health care is solid, people always need Doctor's Nurses, Paramedics, etc. People also need teachers for K-12, but they have a 3 year or so ten-yer period where after that the school can just let them go, no questions asked,(again in NY state). Nurses are done at the end of their shift and go home. Teachers go home and grade homework, plan the next day, look up a topic for class, attend PTA meetings, deal with "difficult" children (babysit), .....etc. Nurses have benefits from their employer, teachers have a union, (NY State k-12) In the end of the day, a nurse will get more money, and possible better, benefits. But you need to deal with sick, old people, or bratty spoiled kids.
Felisha Originally Answered: Pros & cons of being a nurse, specifically LVN?
Teaching is the college educated job that makes the least amount of money. On average, LPNs (aka LVNs) make $46,000 and the program is 12-18 months. Not all nurses work in the hospital. In fact, there aren't many hospitals that really hire LPNs anymore (although they are starting to again). Many LPNs work home health jobs, in doctor's offices, or in skilled nursing facilities. LPNs can also teach CNA's and CMA's (Certified Nursing Assistants and Certified Medicine Aides). An RN-BSN can teach nursing students. However, if you don't want to be a nurse, you shouldn't do it. It takes a lot of dedication to do well in nursing school and a lot of dedication to be a good nurse.

Cristen Cristen
Teaching is the college educated job that makes the least amount of money. On average, LPNs (aka LVNs) make $46,000 and the program is 12-18 months. Not all nurses work in the hospital. In fact, there aren't many hospitals that really hire LPNs anymore (although they are starting to again). Many LPNs work home health jobs, in doctor's offices, or in skilled nursing facilities. LPNs can also teach CNA's and CMA's (Certified Nursing Assistants and Certified Medicine Aides). An RN-BSN can teach nursing students. However, if you don't want to be a nurse, you shouldn't do it. It takes a lot of dedication to do well in nursing school and a lot of dedication to be a good nurse.
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Bettie Bettie
I think you should go into the field that best suits you because in the end you may regret your career. Nursing, though pays good money, can be extremely hard due to complete dedication. A teacher may make less money, but they can also make a difference in someone's life. You have to possess a special ability in both of these fields, so I think you need to think hard on your decision. Although you have pointed out that it will take a considerably longer time to become a teacher, if that is where your heart is it will all be worth the time!
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Bettie Originally Answered: I want to be a NICU nurse?
You need to be a RN, and you can become one with either an Associate's Degree in Nursing or a full Bachelor of Science or Arts in Nursing. An ADN degree will take you about 3 years because you have to complete pre-requisite courses before you can apply to the nursing program, then it is a two year program. For a BSN/BAN you do the pre-reqs and general ed. courses in the first two years then apply to the program and spend the last two years in nursing courses. Either one earns you the license, and either one can work in a NICU. BSN grads just get more leadership / professional / research education and it prepares you more for management positions later in your career. You could always do the ADN and complete the BSN later, too.

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