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How Did the Wives of Henry VIII affect/influence his policies?

How Did the Wives of Henry VIII affect/influence his policies? Topic: how to write a policy paper
June 16, 2019 / By Thomasine
Question: I'm writing a paper on how Henry VIII's policies were affected/influenced by his individual wives. Can anyone give me any answers, or places to find answers? I'm hopeless! If you have anything at all, sources would be great! thanks!
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Best Answers: How Did the Wives of Henry VIII affect/influence his policies?

Roseann Roseann | 6 days ago
Henry VIII's wives changed his policies because with them, he wasn't able to father a male child. The wives led to him leaving the Catholic church in order to be divorced, and his policies changed because he executed his wives. If you google Anne Boleyn or the other wives, you might find more about their fates...it affected Henry VIII's policies.
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Roseann Originally Answered: How Did the Wives of Henry VIII affect/influence his policies?
Henry VIII's wives changed his policies because with them, he wasn't able to father a male child. The wives led to him leaving the Catholic church in order to be divorced, and his policies changed because he executed his wives. If you google Anne Boleyn or the other wives, you might find more about their fates...it affected Henry VIII's policies.
Roseann Originally Answered: How Did the Wives of Henry VIII affect/influence his policies?
Well, his policies were certainly affected by Catherine of Aragon's refusal to agree to a divorce, he broke with th echurch of Rome so that he could annul their marriage and marry Anne Boleyn. Anne Boleyn's interest in Protestantism may have influenced him, but he was against many aspects of Protestantism. Jane Seymour made a brave attempt to influence him against dissolving the monasteries, but he took no notice of her. However, she did help to bring about a reconciliation between Henry and his older daughter Mary.

Mya Mya
Well, his policies were certainly affected by Catherine of Aragon's refusal to agree to a divorce, he broke with th echurch of Rome so that he could annul their marriage and marry Anne Boleyn. Anne Boleyn's interest in Protestantism may have influenced him, but he was against many aspects of Protestantism. Jane Seymour made a brave attempt to influence him against dissolving the monasteries, but he took no notice of her. However, she did help to bring about a reconciliation between Henry and his older daughter Mary.
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Mya Originally Answered: Did henry hudson reach any of his goals? PLZ i need help?
Henry Hudson's goal was to find an easy (ice free) Northern passage to The Pacific Ocean and in that endeavor he failed miserably. Henry Hudson did manage to 'discover' the strait and great bay bearing his name as well as the river named in his honor. In terms of exploration his was a modest success but in the end his crew mutinied and set him & a few loyal crewmen & his son adrift in a boat in the aforementioned bay and to this day there is no record of when & where Hudson died. Despite his misfortune fortune has smiled upon Hudson. Since much of History is British-Centric and the Brits love it when a man dies in the midst of heroic eforts, Hudson has been immortalized, the mutiny romanticiized, but I am fairly certain Hudson would have wanted a different outcome. Gonna throw links & snippets at you http://www.biographi.ca/EN/ShowBio.asp?B... ""Hudson’s achievement gives him a very high rank in the band of navigators from the British Isles who have done so much to unfold the map of the Canadian sub-continent. Parry and Franklin alone can compare with him in the extent to which he outstripped his predecessors and in the sum total of his original discoveries; but Parry was supported by a large, well-trained staff and a disciplined crew, while Franklin owed more to the journeys of Hearne* and Mackenzie* than Hudson to the nebulous findings of Cabot and the Portuguese navigators. The records of the latter, however meritorious, were unfruitful and did little to smooth the path of those who followed them. Single-handed Hudson blazed the way through the 400 miles of his strait and opened up the vast tract of inland sea beyond. More than that, his colossal effort gave his countrymen such an impetus that, barely five years after his disappearance, the rough chart of his bay was nearly complete and Baffin could assert with reasonable confidence that it was a closed sea with no navigable outlet to the west. It was not Hudson’s fault that the English then proved less enterprising than his previous Dutch employers allowing a half-century to elapse before they undertook the commercial exploitation of his last magnificent venture. Ironically, the very importance of Hudson’s achievement served to shield the Discovery’s eight survivors – who were at least guilty of conniving at his fate – from the vengeance of the law. Foremost among these was Robert Bylot whose plea that he had had no share in the mutiny would have been given less weight in a criminal court than the palpable fact that he had been assigned high rank by the mutineers as soon as their crime was accomplished. If he were granted the pardon to which he seemed entitled through his splendid service in retrieving the expedition and its records (as well as his value as a pilot on future, voyages in search of a passage beyond the Bay), the others could hardly be treated with severity. Hence, though some or all of the eight men suffered a period of detention, and the High Court of Admiralty held enquiries over a number of years, there is no record of a prosecution until 1618 when Pricket (who in the meantime had taken part in Button’s expedition to Hudson Bay), Edward Wilson, and two of their former comrades were subjected to a form of trial before the Admiralty court. In view of the lapse of time and mitigating circumstances, the authorities evidently wished to close the case with an acquittal. The four were arraigned, not on the inescapable charge of mutiny, but of murder – and it was not murder to turn experienced seamen adrift near a shore that was neither totally barren nor uninhabited. All four were acquitted.""" FINAL NOTE /// NOI to your question, Hudson's goal was an 'easy' route to China instead he foud himself adrift in a boat in a hostile sea. Peace..........
Mya Originally Answered: Did henry hudson reach any of his goals? PLZ i need help?
Ok he was traveling and then he found America but was trying to find water roughs to Asia so he told all dutch about that place and brought them over well 30 dutch people but tension grew between the lenape and the dutch and they all died the end THAT IS THE STORY

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