1034 Shares

Water Baptism Before John The Baptist?

Water Baptism Before John The Baptist? Topic: Example of community case study
June 16, 2019 / By Abnur
Question: Jews weren't getting baptized before John started baptizing people in water, right? They were getting circumcised. So then was John the Baptist the initiator of water baptism? Or were people getting baptized even before?
Best Answer

Best Answers: Water Baptism Before John The Baptist?

Sloane Sloane | 9 days ago
Few people today actually know and understand why many churches baptize converts to Christianity by immersion. This custom predates Christianity and is based upon Jewish Law and the demands of ritual purity. It is the mikvah! When John the Baptist invited those who were listening to his message to be baptized, his invitation was nothing new for his Jewish audience. They were very familiar with the ritual of baptism and practiced it on a regular basis. This is often a surprise for many Christians because they have been taught that baptism was a new "Christian" thing. The proof offered to support that claim is that we don't find any references to baptism in the Old Testament. However, when we examine the first century Jewish culture of Jesus we discover that baptism, or more correctly ritual self-immersion, was a well-developed and accepted part of Jewish life. Jewish law required Jews to undergo ritual self-immersion if there was any question concerning ritual impurity. Today it is common for Christians to exclusively associate baptism with the forgiveness of sins or salvation. This wasn't the case during the time of Jesus or within Jewish communities today. Many things could be the source of ritual impurity. Many of these were simply the result of the natural course of life - a woman's monthly period, giving birth, or touching something dead. The problem with being ritually impure was that the person in the state of impurity couldn't travel within the Temple precincts or perform certain rituals. We find an example of this in the life of Jesus' mother who is in a state of impurity as the result of giving birth to him. And when the days of her purification according to the law of Moses were fulfilled, they brought him up to Jerusalem, to present him to the Lord (Luke 2:22). Why did Mary do this? It was required by the Torah (Law): Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, If a woman conceive seed, and bear a man-child, then she shall be unclean seven days; as in the days of the impurity of her sickness shall she be unclean. And in the eighth day the flesh of his foreskin shall be circumcised. And she shall continue in the blood of her purifying three and thirty days; she shall touch no hallowed thing, nor come into the sanctuary, until the days of her purifying be fulfilled (Leviticus 12:2-4). It is only after the fulfillment of this law that Mary would have been permitted to enter the Temple precincts and participate in religious rituals. In order to fulfill the law of Moses, Mary would have been required to participate in ritual self-immersion. This was such a common practice in Jerusalem that the Temple constructed a ritual bath complex along the southern wall of the Temple. Archaeologists uncovered this complex in the second half of the twentieth century. Modern Rabbinic Judaism still teaches this form of ritual self-immersion today. We also have scriptural evidence to support the fact that ritual immersion was an act of self-immersion. Baptism in the first century Jewish community, just as it is in modern Jewish communities, is unlike the various styles of Christian baptism practiced in churches today. When John the Baptist baptized Jesus he didn't touch Jesus, neither did he pour water over Jesus' head. Jesus would have immersed himself and John wouldn't have touched him. There are a number of different drawings that depict Jewish baptism over the centuries. One very famous ancient drawing was found in a Roman catacomb, which depicts John and Jesus at Jesus' baptism. John is standing on the bank of the Jordan River extending a hand to Jesus who is standing in the water. gatita Apostolic Believer in One God, Jesus Degree in History (focus Jewish studies) and Spanish, New Mexico State U. 1990
👍 106 | 👎 9
Did you like the answer? Water Baptism Before John The Baptist? Share with your friends

We found more questions related to the topic: Example of community case study


Sloane Originally Answered: Water Baptism Before John The Baptist?
Few people today actually know and understand why many churches baptize converts to Christianity by immersion. This custom predates Christianity and is based upon Jewish Law and the demands of ritual purity. It is the mikvah! When John the Baptist invited those who were listening to his message to be baptized, his invitation was nothing new for his Jewish audience. They were very familiar with the ritual of baptism and practiced it on a regular basis. This is often a surprise for many Christians because they have been taught that baptism was a new "Christian" thing. The proof offered to support that claim is that we don't find any references to baptism in the Old Testament. However, when we examine the first century Jewish culture of Jesus we discover that baptism, or more correctly ritual self-immersion, was a well-developed and accepted part of Jewish life. Jewish law required Jews to undergo ritual self-immersion if there was any question concerning ritual impurity. Today it is common for Christians to exclusively associate baptism with the forgiveness of sins or salvation. This wasn't the case during the time of Jesus or within Jewish communities today. Many things could be the source of ritual impurity. Many of these were simply the result of the natural course of life - a woman's monthly period, giving birth, or touching something dead. The problem with being ritually impure was that the person in the state of impurity couldn't travel within the Temple precincts or perform certain rituals. We find an example of this in the life of Jesus' mother who is in a state of impurity as the result of giving birth to him. And when the days of her purification according to the law of Moses were fulfilled, they brought him up to Jerusalem, to present him to the Lord (Luke 2:22). Why did Mary do this? It was required by the Torah (Law): Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, If a woman conceive seed, and bear a man-child, then she shall be unclean seven days; as in the days of the impurity of her sickness shall she be unclean. And in the eighth day the flesh of his foreskin shall be circumcised. And she shall continue in the blood of her purifying three and thirty days; she shall touch no hallowed thing, nor come into the sanctuary, until the days of her purifying be fulfilled (Leviticus 12:2-4). It is only after the fulfillment of this law that Mary would have been permitted to enter the Temple precincts and participate in religious rituals. In order to fulfill the law of Moses, Mary would have been required to participate in ritual self-immersion. This was such a common practice in Jerusalem that the Temple constructed a ritual bath complex along the southern wall of the Temple. Archaeologists uncovered this complex in the second half of the twentieth century. Modern Rabbinic Judaism still teaches this form of ritual self-immersion today. We also have scriptural evidence to support the fact that ritual immersion was an act of self-immersion. Baptism in the first century Jewish community, just as it is in modern Jewish communities, is unlike the various styles of Christian baptism practiced in churches today. When John the Baptist baptized Jesus he didn't touch Jesus, neither did he pour water over Jesus' head. Jesus would have immersed himself and John wouldn't have touched him. There are a number of different drawings that depict Jewish baptism over the centuries. One very famous ancient drawing was found in a Roman catacomb, which depicts John and Jesus at Jesus' baptism. John is standing on the bank of the Jordan River extending a hand to Jesus who is standing in the water. gatita Apostolic Believer in One God, Jesus Degree in History (focus Jewish studies) and Spanish, New Mexico State U. 1990

Pollie Pollie
This Site Might Help You. RE: Water Baptism Before John The Baptist? Jews weren't getting baptized before John started baptizing people in water, right? They were getting circumcised. So then was John the Baptist the initiator of water baptism? Or were people getting baptized even before?
👍 30 | 👎 3

Matty Matty
Jews did get baptized before John the Baptist- it was a cleansing ritual though and Christian baptism has a different meaning than even John's baptisms did.
👍 22 | 👎 -3

Lashawn Lashawn
There are other sacramental churches. Anglicans, Lutherans, and the Orthodox for sure. The numbers of sacraments can vary. Even Catholics have had differing numbers over the years (and before anyone freaks out, I leaned that at a Catholic seminary!). For example, Anglicans recognize two - Baptism, and Eucharist, as the ones instituted by Jesus. Basically, he said "do this." The others are seen as minor sacraments, so, not with quite the same standing. I have forgotten how many the Orthodox, and Eastern Catholics have. In my Sacraments class, we were 50:50, Catholics, and Anglicans, so, I never did hear. A sacrament is something special - "an outward and visible sign of an inward an invisible grace." Denominations who observe the sacraments think that something real happens in them, e.g., at Eucharist, you receive the Holy Spirit directly. Non-sacramental churches, which includes a lot (not all) of the Protestant ones think these things are symbolic only. So, they put less emphasis on them. But, for the sacramental denominations, these things are vital, because of the grace of God working physically in them.
👍 14 | 👎 -9

Jessa Jessa
the role of John the baptist was to bring the OT into the NT world - he was the last of the OT prophets and the first of the NT there was no water baptism as a ritual before John - but throughout the OT water is known and advised to God's people for its cleansing and purifying properties -- John simply gave it new meaning and purpose the worldwide flood of Noah was a type of baptism Luk 16:16 The law and the prophets [were] until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it. See: OLD TESTAMENT BAPTISM �Water is the element naturally used for cleansing the body and its symbolical use entered into almost every cult, and into none more completely than the Jewish, whose ceremonial washings were proverbial� (�Baptism�, International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Vol 1, page 418). The Dead Sea Scrolls also depict the baptism ritual as something practised by much of Jewry at that time. To this day Jews practice baptism for both male and female converts who immerse themselves in a ritual bath (Jewish Literacy by Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, 1991, page 625). Long before the Jews practised baptism, pre-Christian baptism is found in the Old Testament. For instance, the passing of Israel through the Red Sea on the final Day of Unleavened Bread, was likened to a baptism by Paul (ICor 10:1-2). And further baptismal and resurrection typology may be found in the crossing of the Jordan River which was a type of entering the Kingdom of God followed by pulling down the strongholds of the enemy (Joshua 3:15-17; IICor 10:4). In the Wilderness, at the Tabernacle, the Levites were cleansed via sprinkling of water � a type of baptism � to purify them in preparation in service to God and man (Num 8:6-7,11,21). Similarly Christians must be cleansed and sanctified by sprinkling (Heb 10:22; ICor 11:28; IICor 7:1; Titus 2:14). Further, the Levites had to be bathed or washed clean in water in Ex 29:4 �one of the ceremonial washings referred to in Heb. 6.2, and rendered �baptisms�� (Bullinger, Companion Bible, page 113). Similarly, Christians have been baptised and must be �baptised� by the washing of the spirit each and every day until they die (ICor 6:11; IICor 7:1; Eph 5:25-26). And by connecting Titus 3:5 with IICor 4: 16 and Eph 4:22-24 we can see that we must be washed clean each day by the water and the blood. Other washing rituals may be found in Lev 14:9; Num 19:18 which are evidently types of Christian cleansing and purification at baptism. Not just the baptism with water upon repentance. But daily washings of the Spirit of God. http://cgca.net/coglinks/origin/Historyo...
👍 6 | 👎 -15

Florinda Florinda
Ezekiel 18:20-24 New Century Version (NCV) 20 The person who sins is the one who will die. A child will not be punished for a parent's sin, and a parent will not be punished for a child's sin. Those who do right will enjoy the results of their own goodness; evil people will suffer the results of their own evil. 21 "But suppose the wicked stop doing all the sins they have done and obey all my rules and do what is fair and right. Then they will surely live; they will not die.22 Their sins will be forgotten. Because they have done what is right, they will live.23 I do not really want the wicked to die, says the Lord God. I want them to stop their bad ways and live. 24 "But suppose good people stop doing good and do wrong and do the same hateful things the wicked do. Will they live? All their good acts will be forgotten, because they became unfaithful. They have sinned, so they will die because of their sins.
👍 -2 | 👎 -21

Dalya Dalya
1st Century Christians were going to the Temple of God for daily and holy day sacrifices such as the Passover...etc....then John the Baptist came along and declared full emersion underwater for the remmission of Sins....he prepared the way for the Great High Priest in Heaven....Jesus the Christ........
👍 -10 | 👎 -27

Blossom Blossom
ceremonial cleansing with water and total immersion had been going on for tens of thousands of years before j the B
👍 -18 | 👎 -33

Blossom Originally Answered: What do you think of the Snyder family losing a lawsuit against the Westboro Baptist Church?
I agree with the Supreme Court. But, remember, just because something is legal does not make it right. Protesting at a soldier's funeral may be legal but it is also a very unchristian thing to do. It goes against the Christian spiritual works of mercy to console and comfort and the corporal work of mercy to bury the dead. There are times and places for peaceful demonstrations but a soldier's funeral is not one of them. With love in Christ.

If you have your own answer to the question example of community case study, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.